2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182273
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The NURSE Scale: Nursing's Unique Rating Scale of Evidence
Author(s):
Kring, Daria
Author Details:
Daria Kring, PhD, RN, Forsyth Medical Center, Winston-Salem, North Carolina, USA, email: dlkring@novanthealth.org
Abstract:
Evidence-based practice is the philosophical worldview underpinning today's healthcare decisions. However, translation of research findings into practice can take decades. A critical step to translation is the evaluation of evidence. One evaluation tool is an evidence rating scale (ERS) which ranks research findings according to methodological rigor. ERSs are usually anchored with randomized controlled trials at one end and expert opinion at the other. For nursing, ERSs have several limitations: 1. A bias towards medicine and epidemiology 2. A rigid stance favoring quantitative evidence 3. Exclusive consideration of interventional research 4. Omission of non-research evidence The purpose of this project was to design a nurse-centric ERS. Nurses at a large medical center participated in a three-phase process to design an ERS. First, a literature review identified 12 ERSs. Strengths and limitations of each scale were determined. Second, a new scale was constructed. Finally, feedback was solicited from staff nurses and research experts. The final model was piloted to determine ease of use and adequate guidance. The NURSE Scale uses a hierarchal 5-point system to assign strength to various forms of evidence. Innovations of the scale include: 1. Terminology consistent with nursing science 2. Inclusion of both quantitative and qualitative evidence 3. Addition of non-interventional research 4. Inclusion of non-research evidence. It has performed well in evidence projects, allowing nurses to assign rank to evidence and objectively determine best practice. In addition, it clearly shows when further research is warranted, thus encouraging a culture of nursing research.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Louisville, Kentucky, USA
Description:
"Magnet: Inspiring Innovation, Achieving Outcomes" was the theme and "Explore the relationship among leadership, innovation, and nursing practice outcomes" was the goal of the 13th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 1-3 October, 2009 in Louisville, Kentucky, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe NURSE Scale: Nursing's Unique Rating Scale of Evidenceen_GB
dc.contributor.authorKring, Dariaen_US
dc.author.detailsDaria Kring, PhD, RN, Forsyth Medical Center, Winston-Salem, North Carolina, USA, email: dlkring@novanthealth.orgen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182273-
dc.description.abstractEvidence-based practice is the philosophical worldview underpinning today's healthcare decisions. However, translation of research findings into practice can take decades. A critical step to translation is the evaluation of evidence. One evaluation tool is an evidence rating scale (ERS) which ranks research findings according to methodological rigor. ERSs are usually anchored with randomized controlled trials at one end and expert opinion at the other. For nursing, ERSs have several limitations: 1. A bias towards medicine and epidemiology 2. A rigid stance favoring quantitative evidence 3. Exclusive consideration of interventional research 4. Omission of non-research evidence The purpose of this project was to design a nurse-centric ERS. Nurses at a large medical center participated in a three-phase process to design an ERS. First, a literature review identified 12 ERSs. Strengths and limitations of each scale were determined. Second, a new scale was constructed. Finally, feedback was solicited from staff nurses and research experts. The final model was piloted to determine ease of use and adequate guidance. The NURSE Scale uses a hierarchal 5-point system to assign strength to various forms of evidence. Innovations of the scale include: 1. Terminology consistent with nursing science 2. Inclusion of both quantitative and qualitative evidence 3. Addition of non-interventional research 4. Inclusion of non-research evidence. It has performed well in evidence projects, allowing nurses to assign rank to evidence and objectively determine best practice. In addition, it clearly shows when further research is warranted, thus encouraging a culture of nursing research.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:16:54Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:16:54Z-
dc.conference.date2009en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationLouisville, Kentucky, USAen_US
dc.description"Magnet: Inspiring Innovation, Achieving Outcomes" was the theme and "Explore the relationship among leadership, innovation, and nursing practice outcomes" was the goal of the 13th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 1-3 October, 2009 in Louisville, Kentucky, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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