2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182275
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Effects of Oxytocin Administration Checklists on Perinatal Safety
Author(s):
Mahony, Jill
Author Details:
Jill Mahony, RNC-OB, WHNP-BC, MSN, APN, C, Capital Health System, Trenton, New Jersey, USA, email: jmahony@chsnj.org
Abstract:
This study replicates Stephen Clark et als research on use of protocol-driven safety checklists for oxytocin administration (2007). The setting is an urban tertiary perinatal center in northeastern United States, serving an ethnically diverse population (2400+ deliveries/year). Criteria include women with singleton, vertex, term pregnancies, and an unscarred uterus receiving oxytocin for labor induction/augmentation. Strategies that facilitated EBP use included multidisciplinary collaborative development of an oxytocin administration protocol supported by education, a revised policy, preprinted orders, and the checklists. Physicians, nurse midwives, and laborskilled registered nurses received evidence-based education on oxytocin administration standardized through application of oxytocin safety checklists. In September 2008, registered nurses implemented the protocol as sole administrators of oxytocin. Outcome measures include labor length, cesarean delivery, peak oxytocin dosage, and non-intervened uterine tachysystole using chart review data from two cohorts. Cohort 1 (n=100) preceded safety checklist use. Cohort 2 (n=100) followed implementation of a practice change using safety checklists. Analysis demonstrates no significant increase in labor length or cesarean section rates but a significant decrease in mean peak oxytocin dose for Cohort 2 (p< .03). A significant difference in non-intervened episodes of uterine tachysystole is noted between Cohort 1 (mean = 1.35) and Cohort 2 (mean = .49) with an independent t test significance level of .04. The hypothesis is that uniform practice patterns using protocol-driven checklists for oxytocin administration during induction/augmentation achieve a higher safety level without lengthening labor or increasing cesarean section rates. References: Clark S. L., Simpson K. R., Knox G. E., & Garite, T. (2008). Oxytocin: New perspectives on an old drug. American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology, 200(1), 35.e1-35.e7.; Clark, S. L., Belfort M. A., Byrum S. L., Meyers, J., & Perlin, J. (2008). Improved outcomes, fewer cesarean deliveries, and reduced litigation: Results of a new paradigm in patient safety. American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology, 199(2), 105.e1-105.e7.; Clark, S. L., Belfort, M. A., Saade, G, Hankins, G., Miller, D., Frye, D., and Meyers, J. (2007). Implementation of a conservative checklist-based protocol for oxytocin administration: Maternal & newborn outcomes. American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, 29(2), 480.e1-480.e5. ; Clayworth, S. (2000). The nurses role in oxytocin administration. The American Journal of Maternal Child Nursing, 25(2), 80-85.; Kosnick, L., Brown, J., and T. Maund. (2007). Learning from the aviation industry, Nursing Management, 25-30. Retrieved from www.nursing management.com.; Simpson, K. R. & Knox, G. E. (2003). Common areas of litigation related to care during labor and birth. Journal of Perinatal/Neonatal Nursing, 17(2), 110-125.; Simpson, K. R. & Knox, G. E. (2003). Trends and issues in labor induction in the Unites States: Implications for clinical practice. Journal of Obstetric, Gynecologic, and Neonatal Nursing. 32(6), 767-779. ; Simpson, K. R. (2004). Management of oxytocin for labor induction and augmentation. The American Journal of Maternal Child Nursing, 29(2), 136.; Simpson, K. R. (2008). AWHONN Monograph: Cervical ripening and induction and Augmentation of labor, 3rd Ed. Washington, DC: Association of Womens Health, Obstetric, and Neonatal Nurses. ; Veltman, L. (2007). Getting to havarti Moving towards patient safety in obstetrics. The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, 110(5), 1146-50.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Louisville, Kentucky, USA
Description:
"Magnet: Inspiring Innovation, Achieving Outcomes" was the theme and "Explore the relationship among leadership, innovation, and nursing practice outcomes" was the goal of the 13th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 1-3 October, 2009 in Louisville, Kentucky, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEffects of Oxytocin Administration Checklists on Perinatal Safetyen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMahony, Jillen_US
dc.author.detailsJill Mahony, RNC-OB, WHNP-BC, MSN, APN, C, Capital Health System, Trenton, New Jersey, USA, email: jmahony@chsnj.orgen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182275-
dc.description.abstractThis study replicates Stephen Clark et als research on use of protocol-driven safety checklists for oxytocin administration (2007). The setting is an urban tertiary perinatal center in northeastern United States, serving an ethnically diverse population (2400+ deliveries/year). Criteria include women with singleton, vertex, term pregnancies, and an unscarred uterus receiving oxytocin for labor induction/augmentation. Strategies that facilitated EBP use included multidisciplinary collaborative development of an oxytocin administration protocol supported by education, a revised policy, preprinted orders, and the checklists. Physicians, nurse midwives, and laborskilled registered nurses received evidence-based education on oxytocin administration standardized through application of oxytocin safety checklists. In September 2008, registered nurses implemented the protocol as sole administrators of oxytocin. Outcome measures include labor length, cesarean delivery, peak oxytocin dosage, and non-intervened uterine tachysystole using chart review data from two cohorts. Cohort 1 (n=100) preceded safety checklist use. Cohort 2 (n=100) followed implementation of a practice change using safety checklists. Analysis demonstrates no significant increase in labor length or cesarean section rates but a significant decrease in mean peak oxytocin dose for Cohort 2 (p&lt; .03). A significant difference in non-intervened episodes of uterine tachysystole is noted between Cohort 1 (mean = 1.35) and Cohort 2 (mean = .49) with an independent t test significance level of .04. The hypothesis is that uniform practice patterns using protocol-driven checklists for oxytocin administration during induction/augmentation achieve a higher safety level without lengthening labor or increasing cesarean section rates. References: Clark S. L., Simpson K. R., Knox G. E., & Garite, T. (2008). Oxytocin: New perspectives on an old drug. American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology, 200(1), 35.e1-35.e7.; Clark, S. L., Belfort M. A., Byrum S. L., Meyers, J., & Perlin, J. (2008). Improved outcomes, fewer cesarean deliveries, and reduced litigation: Results of a new paradigm in patient safety. American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology, 199(2), 105.e1-105.e7.; Clark, S. L., Belfort, M. A., Saade, G, Hankins, G., Miller, D., Frye, D., and Meyers, J. (2007). Implementation of a conservative checklist-based protocol for oxytocin administration: Maternal & newborn outcomes. American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, 29(2), 480.e1-480.e5. ; Clayworth, S. (2000). The nurses role in oxytocin administration. The American Journal of Maternal Child Nursing, 25(2), 80-85.; Kosnick, L., Brown, J., and T. Maund. (2007). Learning from the aviation industry, Nursing Management, 25-30. Retrieved from www.nursing management.com.; Simpson, K. R. & Knox, G. E. (2003). Common areas of litigation related to care during labor and birth. Journal of Perinatal/Neonatal Nursing, 17(2), 110-125.; Simpson, K. R. & Knox, G. E. (2003). Trends and issues in labor induction in the Unites States: Implications for clinical practice. Journal of Obstetric, Gynecologic, and Neonatal Nursing. 32(6), 767-779. ; Simpson, K. R. (2004). Management of oxytocin for labor induction and augmentation. The American Journal of Maternal Child Nursing, 29(2), 136.; Simpson, K. R. (2008). AWHONN Monograph: Cervical ripening and induction and Augmentation of labor, 3rd Ed. Washington, DC: Association of Womens Health, Obstetric, and Neonatal Nurses. ; Veltman, L. (2007). Getting to havarti Moving towards patient safety in obstetrics. The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, 110(5), 1146-50.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:17:00Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:17:00Z-
dc.conference.date2009en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationLouisville, Kentucky, USAen_US
dc.description"Magnet: Inspiring Innovation, Achieving Outcomes" was the theme and "Explore the relationship among leadership, innovation, and nursing practice outcomes" was the goal of the 13th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 1-3 October, 2009 in Louisville, Kentucky, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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