2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182277
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Actualizing Homeland Security Goals in the ED through Hazmat Training
Author(s):
Mandelin, III, Charles
Author Details:
Charles Mandelin, III, RN, BSN, CEN, Duke Univeristy Hospital, Durham, North Carolina, USA, email: mande006@mc.duke.edu
Abstract:
While most mass casualty incidents involve typical emergency department patients who sustain trauma and little else, disasters involving chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear, and explosive hazards (CBRNE) require a level of expertise not common in nursing. This tertiary care facility created a comprehensive approach to disaster management by concentrating on department preparation and staff training. Five staff nurses attended the US Department of Homeland Security, Federal Emergency Management Agency Center for Domestic Preparedness course on Hospital Emergency Response Training for Mass Casualty Incidents (MCI) through a Department of Homeland Security Grant. This training teaches the use of appropriate personal protective equipment, decontamination, field triage, the essential knowledge of chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear, and high yield explosive (CBRNE) medical evaluation and treatment, and the integration of community and agency incident command with hospital incident command. This core team has completed 10 training sessions and one mock disaster. The number of trained staff has increased from 5% to 40%. At present three emergency nurses continue to effectively manage the program to meet the needs of 105 FTEs. Based on this experience, an ED-based training program for hospital emergency response to a MCI is practical, pragmatic, and easy to maintain with as little as three nurses per 100 staff nurses. The Hospital Emergency Response Training for MCI is an excellent foundation. Future goals aside from maintenance of continued staff nurse training is to implement scenario based drills, conduct more mock disasters, and continue CBRNE education for the ED staff.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Louisville, Kentucky, USA
Description:
"Magnet: Inspiring Innovation, Achieving Outcomes" was the theme and "Explore the relationship among leadership, innovation, and nursing practice outcomes" was the goal of the 13th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 1-3 October, 2009 in Louisville, Kentucky, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleActualizing Homeland Security Goals in the ED through Hazmat Trainingen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMandelin, III, Charlesen_US
dc.author.detailsCharles Mandelin, III, RN, BSN, CEN, Duke Univeristy Hospital, Durham, North Carolina, USA, email: mande006@mc.duke.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182277-
dc.description.abstractWhile most mass casualty incidents involve typical emergency department patients who sustain trauma and little else, disasters involving chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear, and explosive hazards (CBRNE) require a level of expertise not common in nursing. This tertiary care facility created a comprehensive approach to disaster management by concentrating on department preparation and staff training. Five staff nurses attended the US Department of Homeland Security, Federal Emergency Management Agency Center for Domestic Preparedness course on Hospital Emergency Response Training for Mass Casualty Incidents (MCI) through a Department of Homeland Security Grant. This training teaches the use of appropriate personal protective equipment, decontamination, field triage, the essential knowledge of chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear, and high yield explosive (CBRNE) medical evaluation and treatment, and the integration of community and agency incident command with hospital incident command. This core team has completed 10 training sessions and one mock disaster. The number of trained staff has increased from 5% to 40%. At present three emergency nurses continue to effectively manage the program to meet the needs of 105 FTEs. Based on this experience, an ED-based training program for hospital emergency response to a MCI is practical, pragmatic, and easy to maintain with as little as three nurses per 100 staff nurses. The Hospital Emergency Response Training for MCI is an excellent foundation. Future goals aside from maintenance of continued staff nurse training is to implement scenario based drills, conduct more mock disasters, and continue CBRNE education for the ED staff.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:17:05Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:17:05Z-
dc.conference.date2009en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationLouisville, Kentucky, USAen_US
dc.description"Magnet: Inspiring Innovation, Achieving Outcomes" was the theme and "Explore the relationship among leadership, innovation, and nursing practice outcomes" was the goal of the 13th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 1-3 October, 2009 in Louisville, Kentucky, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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