2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182278
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Effects of Complexity and Exponential Growth on Nursing Practice
Author(s):
Martin, Patricia
Author Details:
Patricia Martin, MSN, RN, CNOR, The Methodist Hospital, Houston, Texas, USA, email: pamartin@tmhs.org
Abstract:
Transformational leadership is vital to success in the 21st century. Nurses may become frustrated by the explosion of technologies that others impose on their practices and look to nursing champions for support. These external forces include, but are not limited to, information system experts, governmental agencies, and vendors. The rapidly changing environment created by these technologies does not support the autonomy most nurses seek or empower them to provide high quality patient care. However, it does create a learning curve and other barriers to success. The exponential growth of health care technologies and systems that support health care delivery demand immediate acceptance and proficiency in state of the art technology. Ray Kurzweil, an Artificial Intelligence expert, proposes there is a difference in the way people perceive the rapidity of technological advances and the actual rate at which they occur. His description of the Intuitive Linear View and the Historical Exponential View offers an explanation of the difficulties experienced by nurses as they rush to accept and adapt to innovations in health care. Complexity theory and new concepts such as tipping points and the butterfly effect offer explanations of how social and organizational changes occur and their effect on people. This presentation explores how rapid technological advances applied in the complex adaptive system of health care delivery affect nursing practice and job satisfaction, therefore supporting the need for transformational leadership to successfully navigate the next century.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Louisville, Kentucky, USA
Description:
"Magnet: Inspiring Innovation, Achieving Outcomes" was the theme and "Explore the relationship among leadership, innovation, and nursing practice outcomes" was the goal of the 13th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 1-3 October, 2009 in Louisville, Kentucky, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Effects of Complexity and Exponential Growth on Nursing Practiceen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMartin, Patriciaen_US
dc.author.detailsPatricia Martin, MSN, RN, CNOR, The Methodist Hospital, Houston, Texas, USA, email: pamartin@tmhs.orgen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182278-
dc.description.abstractTransformational leadership is vital to success in the 21st century. Nurses may become frustrated by the explosion of technologies that others impose on their practices and look to nursing champions for support. These external forces include, but are not limited to, information system experts, governmental agencies, and vendors. The rapidly changing environment created by these technologies does not support the autonomy most nurses seek or empower them to provide high quality patient care. However, it does create a learning curve and other barriers to success. The exponential growth of health care technologies and systems that support health care delivery demand immediate acceptance and proficiency in state of the art technology. Ray Kurzweil, an Artificial Intelligence expert, proposes there is a difference in the way people perceive the rapidity of technological advances and the actual rate at which they occur. His description of the Intuitive Linear View and the Historical Exponential View offers an explanation of the difficulties experienced by nurses as they rush to accept and adapt to innovations in health care. Complexity theory and new concepts such as tipping points and the butterfly effect offer explanations of how social and organizational changes occur and their effect on people. This presentation explores how rapid technological advances applied in the complex adaptive system of health care delivery affect nursing practice and job satisfaction, therefore supporting the need for transformational leadership to successfully navigate the next century.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:17:08Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:17:08Z-
dc.conference.date2009en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationLouisville, Kentucky, USAen_US
dc.description"Magnet: Inspiring Innovation, Achieving Outcomes" was the theme and "Explore the relationship among leadership, innovation, and nursing practice outcomes" was the goal of the 13th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 1-3 October, 2009 in Louisville, Kentucky, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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