2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182280
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Empowered Nursing Teamwork Results in Reducing Hospital Acquired Pressure Ulcers
Author(s):
Matthews, Shirley
Author Details:
Shirley Matthews, RN, MSN, CWOCN, CNS, Forsyth Medical Center, Winston-Salem, North Carolina, USA, email: sdmatthews@novanthealth.org
Abstract:
Over 2.5 million people in the United States are affected every year by the development of a pressure ulcer which results in unnecessary pain and suffering as well as an increasing financial burden to our health care system. The estimated cost of pressure ulcers can be as high as $11 billion and more than 50,000 people die every year as a result of pressure ulcer complications. In October 2008, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services identified pressures ulcers as a reasonably preventable condition for which hospitals will no longer receive additional payments if not present on admission. In January 2008, our 975- bed facility launched an initiative aimed at increasing the identification of pressure ulcers present upon admission and decreasing the number of hospital acquired pressure ulcers. To achieve these goals, the Pressure Ulcer Improvement Team developed a screening tool completed upon admission by nurses in all inpatient and procedural areas. In addition, an electronic wound care consultation was created for immediate notification of the Wound Ostomy nurse when there was any indication of skin impairment related to pressure. More than 95% of our patients are screened on admission for skin impairment and our pressure ulcer rate has declined from 3.5% to 0.02% and 0.04% for the last two quarters of 2008. We can attribute these results to a hardwired admission assessment process, increased awareness of the importance of skin assessments, autonomous consultation of the Wound Ostomy team by staff nurses, and enhanced training for staff and nursing leaders.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Louisville, Kentucky, USA
Description:
"Magnet: Inspiring Innovation, Achieving Outcomes" was the theme and "Explore the relationship among leadership, innovation, and nursing practice outcomes" was the goal of the 13th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 1-3 October, 2009 in Louisville, Kentucky, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEmpowered Nursing Teamwork Results in Reducing Hospital Acquired Pressure Ulcersen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMatthews, Shirleyen_US
dc.author.detailsShirley Matthews, RN, MSN, CWOCN, CNS, Forsyth Medical Center, Winston-Salem, North Carolina, USA, email: sdmatthews@novanthealth.orgen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182280-
dc.description.abstractOver 2.5 million people in the United States are affected every year by the development of a pressure ulcer which results in unnecessary pain and suffering as well as an increasing financial burden to our health care system. The estimated cost of pressure ulcers can be as high as $11 billion and more than 50,000 people die every year as a result of pressure ulcer complications. In October 2008, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services identified pressures ulcers as a reasonably preventable condition for which hospitals will no longer receive additional payments if not present on admission. In January 2008, our 975- bed facility launched an initiative aimed at increasing the identification of pressure ulcers present upon admission and decreasing the number of hospital acquired pressure ulcers. To achieve these goals, the Pressure Ulcer Improvement Team developed a screening tool completed upon admission by nurses in all inpatient and procedural areas. In addition, an electronic wound care consultation was created for immediate notification of the Wound Ostomy nurse when there was any indication of skin impairment related to pressure. More than 95% of our patients are screened on admission for skin impairment and our pressure ulcer rate has declined from 3.5% to 0.02% and 0.04% for the last two quarters of 2008. We can attribute these results to a hardwired admission assessment process, increased awareness of the importance of skin assessments, autonomous consultation of the Wound Ostomy team by staff nurses, and enhanced training for staff and nursing leaders.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:17:13Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:17:13Z-
dc.conference.date2009en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationLouisville, Kentucky, USAen_US
dc.description"Magnet: Inspiring Innovation, Achieving Outcomes" was the theme and "Explore the relationship among leadership, innovation, and nursing practice outcomes" was the goal of the 13th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 1-3 October, 2009 in Louisville, Kentucky, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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