2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182285
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Reengineering the Preceptor Model: Strategies for Staff Satisfaction, Retention, and Development
Author(s):
Meinert, Pamela
Author Details:
Pamela Meinert, PhD, MSN, FNP-BC, RN, Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, Hershey, Pennsylvania, USA, email: pmeinert@hmc.psu.edu
Abstract:
This presentation describes a Team Preceptor model: an innovative method of graduate nurse orientation. Common problems associated with overuse of experienced preceptors are addressed. Adult learning theory and Benner's levels of nurse development provide the framework for this model. Benner describes a continuum of development for nurses ranging from novice through expert. This model utilizes the unique skills of the advanced beginner nurse as well as the competent, proficient and expert nurse. Integrating the advanced beginner into a preceptor model fosters professional development and increases the supply of developing preceptors. Incorporating adult learning theory regarding simple to complex progression and socialization support during learning are key aspects of this model. The initial preceptor is responsible for developing technical skills, basic organization, unit socialization and prioritization in the graduate nurse. Simple problem solving is the focus of the initial orientation period. These skills are well suited to the advanced beginner nurse, but may be difficult for a more advanced nurse to communicate. The second preceptor works to develop critical thinking skills, more complex technical skills, prioritization and organizational skills. Limiting the use of experienced preceptors to this phase of orientation prevents preceptor overuse and burnout. This team preceptor model addresses common problems associated with a traditional preceptor model while developing the young advanced beginner nurse, supporting the graduate nurse and using the strengths of the competent and expert nurse. This model has demonstrated increased staff satisfaction and increased the number of nurses willing to act as preceptor. References: Benner, P. (1984). From novice to expert: Excellence and power in clinical nursing practice. Menlo Park, CA: Addison-Wesley.; Knowles, M. S. (1970). The modern practice of adult education: Andragogy versus pedagogy. New York: Cambridge University Press.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Louisville, Kentucky, USA
Description:
"Magnet: Inspiring Innovation, Achieving Outcomes" was the theme and "Explore the relationship among leadership, innovation, and nursing practice outcomes" was the goal of the 13th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 1-3 October, 2009 in Louisville, Kentucky, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleReengineering the Preceptor Model: Strategies for Staff Satisfaction, Retention, and Developmenten_GB
dc.contributor.authorMeinert, Pamelaen_US
dc.author.detailsPamela Meinert, PhD, MSN, FNP-BC, RN, Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, Hershey, Pennsylvania, USA, email: pmeinert@hmc.psu.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182285-
dc.description.abstractThis presentation describes a Team Preceptor model: an innovative method of graduate nurse orientation. Common problems associated with overuse of experienced preceptors are addressed. Adult learning theory and Benner's levels of nurse development provide the framework for this model. Benner describes a continuum of development for nurses ranging from novice through expert. This model utilizes the unique skills of the advanced beginner nurse as well as the competent, proficient and expert nurse. Integrating the advanced beginner into a preceptor model fosters professional development and increases the supply of developing preceptors. Incorporating adult learning theory regarding simple to complex progression and socialization support during learning are key aspects of this model. The initial preceptor is responsible for developing technical skills, basic organization, unit socialization and prioritization in the graduate nurse. Simple problem solving is the focus of the initial orientation period. These skills are well suited to the advanced beginner nurse, but may be difficult for a more advanced nurse to communicate. The second preceptor works to develop critical thinking skills, more complex technical skills, prioritization and organizational skills. Limiting the use of experienced preceptors to this phase of orientation prevents preceptor overuse and burnout. This team preceptor model addresses common problems associated with a traditional preceptor model while developing the young advanced beginner nurse, supporting the graduate nurse and using the strengths of the competent and expert nurse. This model has demonstrated increased staff satisfaction and increased the number of nurses willing to act as preceptor. References: Benner, P. (1984). From novice to expert: Excellence and power in clinical nursing practice. Menlo Park, CA: Addison-Wesley.; Knowles, M. S. (1970). The modern practice of adult education: Andragogy versus pedagogy. New York: Cambridge University Press.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:17:28Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:17:28Z-
dc.conference.date2009en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationLouisville, Kentucky, USAen_US
dc.description"Magnet: Inspiring Innovation, Achieving Outcomes" was the theme and "Explore the relationship among leadership, innovation, and nursing practice outcomes" was the goal of the 13th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 1-3 October, 2009 in Louisville, Kentucky, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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