2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182286
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Improving Culture and Learning from Errors with a Nursing Morbidity and Mortality Program
Author(s):
Menendez, Jane
Author Details:
Jane Menendez, RN, Northwestern Memorial Hospital, Chicago, Illinois, USA, email: jmenende@nmh.org
Abstract:
Background: A fundamental characteristic of a Magnet organization is the demonstration of processes that support a culture of patient safety. It is undeniable that a culture of safety supports nurses and improves the quality of care, but it can be difficult to envision specific efforts that influence culture. Our organization created a forum for the open discussion of adverse events occurring at our hospital: the Nursing Morbidity and Mortality (M&M) program. Purpose: Our goal was to promote a culture of safety by engaging frontline nurses in the analysis of real adverse events, thereby promoting systems-based thinking and a non-punitive atmosphere. Description: Created under the organizations quality program, Nursing M&Ms are monthly presentations of case studies taken from events reported through the hospitals incident reporting system. Events are chosen based on their relevance to nursing practice. These case studies can be presented in discussion format during staff meetings or as online interactive modules. Conclusions: The Nursing M&M program has been in place for more than four years; each monthly program is completed by approximately 90% of our nursing staff. Improvements in culture have been reflected in statistically significant increases in nursing staff perceptions of culture over time.1 We believe that: Involving nurses in the systematic examination of adverse events promotes transparency, systems-level thinking, and a non-punitive atmosphere. Responding to clinicians voluntary reports of adverse events encourages reporting by demonstrating an institutional commitment to learning from error. The Nursing M&M program improves nurses perceptions of organizational culture.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Louisville, Kentucky, USA
Description:
"Magnet: Inspiring Innovation, Achieving Outcomes" was the theme and "Explore the relationship among leadership, innovation, and nursing practice outcomes" was the goal of the 13th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 1-3 October, 2009 in Louisville, Kentucky, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleImproving Culture and Learning from Errors with a Nursing Morbidity and Mortality Programen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMenendez, Janeen_US
dc.author.detailsJane Menendez, RN, Northwestern Memorial Hospital, Chicago, Illinois, USA, email: jmenende@nmh.orgen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182286-
dc.description.abstractBackground: A fundamental characteristic of a Magnet organization is the demonstration of processes that support a culture of patient safety. It is undeniable that a culture of safety supports nurses and improves the quality of care, but it can be difficult to envision specific efforts that influence culture. Our organization created a forum for the open discussion of adverse events occurring at our hospital: the Nursing Morbidity and Mortality (M&M) program. Purpose: Our goal was to promote a culture of safety by engaging frontline nurses in the analysis of real adverse events, thereby promoting systems-based thinking and a non-punitive atmosphere. Description: Created under the organizations quality program, Nursing M&Ms are monthly presentations of case studies taken from events reported through the hospitals incident reporting system. Events are chosen based on their relevance to nursing practice. These case studies can be presented in discussion format during staff meetings or as online interactive modules. Conclusions: The Nursing M&M program has been in place for more than four years; each monthly program is completed by approximately 90% of our nursing staff. Improvements in culture have been reflected in statistically significant increases in nursing staff perceptions of culture over time.1 We believe that: Involving nurses in the systematic examination of adverse events promotes transparency, systems-level thinking, and a non-punitive atmosphere. Responding to clinicians voluntary reports of adverse events encourages reporting by demonstrating an institutional commitment to learning from error. The Nursing M&M program improves nurses perceptions of organizational culture.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:17:31Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:17:31Z-
dc.conference.date2009en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationLouisville, Kentucky, USAen_US
dc.description"Magnet: Inspiring Innovation, Achieving Outcomes" was the theme and "Explore the relationship among leadership, innovation, and nursing practice outcomes" was the goal of the 13th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 1-3 October, 2009 in Louisville, Kentucky, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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