2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182304
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Post Discharge Nausea and Vomiting: Incidence and Management Strategies
Author(s):
Odom-Forren, Jan
Author Details:
Jan Odom-Forren, PhD Candidate, RN, CPAN, FAAN, Baptist Hospital East, Louisville, Kentucky, USA, email: jodom29373@aol.com
Abstract:
Introduction/Problem: Post discharge nausea and vomiting (PDNV) is nausea and/or vomiting that occurs after discharge from the healthcare facility after outpatient surgery.1 The incidence of PDNV has been reported from 0 to 55%.2-4 Little research accurately describes the incidence and severity of PDNV.5-6 As a consequence, management and treatment of PDNV has been seriously overlooked and patients suffer at home unable to return to work or other activities. Purpose: The purpose of this study is to describe the incidence and severity of PDNV and to compare the incidence and severity of PDNV between patients who do and do not use pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic modalities. Methodology: This study is part of a multi-site prospective survey of 2170 patients undergoing outpatient surgery in 12 U.S. centers. Participants provided self-reported data and completed a patient diary addressing symptoms and how these symptoms impaired functional living. All patients reported symptoms for 48 hours with a sub-set convenience sample of 260 subjects from two centers reporting symptoms for 7 days. Results/Discussion: Preliminary analyses have shown females suffer PDNV at a higher rate than males, and that some patients experience PDNV up to 7 days after surgery. Anticipated findings should clarify the incidence and severity of symptoms for up to 7 days. Conclusion: Research examining clinical outcomes for post surgery patients is crucial to the continued successful development of interventions that will decrease symptoms and increase quality of life for these patients.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Louisville, Kentucky, USA
Description:
"Magnet: Inspiring Innovation, Achieving Outcomes" was the theme and "Explore the relationship among leadership, innovation, and nursing practice outcomes" was the goal of the 13th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 1-3 October, 2009 in Louisville, Kentucky, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePost Discharge Nausea and Vomiting: Incidence and Management Strategiesen_GB
dc.contributor.authorOdom-Forren, Janen_US
dc.author.detailsJan Odom-Forren, PhD Candidate, RN, CPAN, FAAN, Baptist Hospital East, Louisville, Kentucky, USA, email: jodom29373@aol.comen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182304-
dc.description.abstractIntroduction/Problem: Post discharge nausea and vomiting (PDNV) is nausea and/or vomiting that occurs after discharge from the healthcare facility after outpatient surgery.1 The incidence of PDNV has been reported from 0 to 55%.2-4 Little research accurately describes the incidence and severity of PDNV.5-6 As a consequence, management and treatment of PDNV has been seriously overlooked and patients suffer at home unable to return to work or other activities. Purpose: The purpose of this study is to describe the incidence and severity of PDNV and to compare the incidence and severity of PDNV between patients who do and do not use pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic modalities. Methodology: This study is part of a multi-site prospective survey of 2170 patients undergoing outpatient surgery in 12 U.S. centers. Participants provided self-reported data and completed a patient diary addressing symptoms and how these symptoms impaired functional living. All patients reported symptoms for 48 hours with a sub-set convenience sample of 260 subjects from two centers reporting symptoms for 7 days. Results/Discussion: Preliminary analyses have shown females suffer PDNV at a higher rate than males, and that some patients experience PDNV up to 7 days after surgery. Anticipated findings should clarify the incidence and severity of symptoms for up to 7 days. Conclusion: Research examining clinical outcomes for post surgery patients is crucial to the continued successful development of interventions that will decrease symptoms and increase quality of life for these patients.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:18:19Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:18:19Z-
dc.conference.date2009en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationLouisville, Kentucky, USAen_US
dc.description"Magnet: Inspiring Innovation, Achieving Outcomes" was the theme and "Explore the relationship among leadership, innovation, and nursing practice outcomes" was the goal of the 13th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 1-3 October, 2009 in Louisville, Kentucky, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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