2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182309
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Retention of New Graduate Nurses: A Preliminary Survival Analysis
Author(s):
Oster, Cynthia
Author Details:
Cynthia Oster, PhD, MBA, APRN, CNS/ANP, Porter Adventist Hospital, Denver, Colorado, USA, email: cynthiaoster@centura.org
Abstract:
A 30% turnover rate among graduate nurses in year one of practice may climb to 57% in year two (Bowles & Candela, 2005). The study purpose was to estimate retention of new graduate nurses experiencing three different on-boarding strategies and determine risk points for loss. One and two year retention of graduates who participated in one of three on-boarding strategies was collected for 2006 and 2007. The strategies were graduate classes plus dedicated education unit (DEU) clinical experience; unit orientation only; and graduate classes with unit orientation. Data collected were start dates, termination dates, and program type. Termination time in months was calculated. Kaplan-Meier analysis was used to model survival for the overall group and each program. Probability of survival and survival curves were generated. The log-rank test determined if differences in retention by program were significant. Sixteen graduates oriented through the DEU, 16 through unit orientation only, and 43 through graduate classes with unit orientation. Differences in termination rates were not statistically different (X2 = .134, p >.05). Program survival probabilities were not significantly different (log rank = .06, p >.05). Risk points for termination were 7, 14, and 22 months. Differences may not have been detectable due to the short time period all three programs existed and the relatively small number of total terminations (n = 14). Additional longitudinal analysis may reveal advantages of one approach. Identified risk points provide actionable information to plan intensive preventive interventions to prevent loss in the first two years of employment. References: Bowles, C. & Candela, L. (2005). First job experiences of recent RN graduates. Journal of Nursing Administration, 35(3), 130 -137.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Louisville, Kentucky, USA
Description:
"Magnet: Inspiring Innovation, Achieving Outcomes" was the theme and "Explore the relationship among leadership, innovation, and nursing practice outcomes" was the goal of the 13th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 1-3 October, 2009 in Louisville, Kentucky, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleRetention of New Graduate Nurses: A Preliminary Survival Analysisen_GB
dc.contributor.authorOster, Cynthiaen_US
dc.author.detailsCynthia Oster, PhD, MBA, APRN, CNS/ANP, Porter Adventist Hospital, Denver, Colorado, USA, email: cynthiaoster@centura.orgen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182309-
dc.description.abstractA 30% turnover rate among graduate nurses in year one of practice may climb to 57% in year two (Bowles & Candela, 2005). The study purpose was to estimate retention of new graduate nurses experiencing three different on-boarding strategies and determine risk points for loss. One and two year retention of graduates who participated in one of three on-boarding strategies was collected for 2006 and 2007. The strategies were graduate classes plus dedicated education unit (DEU) clinical experience; unit orientation only; and graduate classes with unit orientation. Data collected were start dates, termination dates, and program type. Termination time in months was calculated. Kaplan-Meier analysis was used to model survival for the overall group and each program. Probability of survival and survival curves were generated. The log-rank test determined if differences in retention by program were significant. Sixteen graduates oriented through the DEU, 16 through unit orientation only, and 43 through graduate classes with unit orientation. Differences in termination rates were not statistically different (X2 = .134, p >.05). Program survival probabilities were not significantly different (log rank = .06, p >.05). Risk points for termination were 7, 14, and 22 months. Differences may not have been detectable due to the short time period all three programs existed and the relatively small number of total terminations (n = 14). Additional longitudinal analysis may reveal advantages of one approach. Identified risk points provide actionable information to plan intensive preventive interventions to prevent loss in the first two years of employment. References: Bowles, C. & Candela, L. (2005). First job experiences of recent RN graduates. Journal of Nursing Administration, 35(3), 130 -137.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:18:32Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:18:32Z-
dc.conference.date2009en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationLouisville, Kentucky, USAen_US
dc.description"Magnet: Inspiring Innovation, Achieving Outcomes" was the theme and "Explore the relationship among leadership, innovation, and nursing practice outcomes" was the goal of the 13th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 1-3 October, 2009 in Louisville, Kentucky, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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