Are There Disparities in Parents' and Hospitalized Children's Perceptions of the Quality of Nursing Care?

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182331
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Are There Disparities in Parents' and Hospitalized Children's Perceptions of the Quality of Nursing Care?
Author(s):
Ryan-Wenger, Nancy A.
Author Details:
Nancy Ryan-Wenger, RN, PhD, CPNP, FAAN, Nationwide Children's Hospital, Columbus, Ohio, USA, email: nancy.ryanwenger@nationwidechildrens.org
Abstract:
Research shows evidence of a social gradient in parents' perceptions of their children's health status, perhaps, in part, due to differences in the quality of care that is provided. This interdisciplinary cross-sectional study of 500 six- to 21-year-old hospitalized children examines the quality of nursing care from the children's and parents' perspectives for evidence of disparities across social constructs of age, gender, race/ethnicity, and socioeconomic status (SES). Structured interviews and systematic content analysis were used to obtain the children's and their parents' assessment of the quality of the children's nursing care. The sample is approximately 2/3 white and 1/3 African-American. SES was indirectly estimated by method of payment (private insurance vs public assistance), and by socioeconomic characteristics of the communities in which the families lived, including median household income, percent unemployed, and percent below the poverty line. The psychophysiological context in which the children responded was measured by quality of life, anxiety and depression scales. In the context of ecological development, our research will reveal the extent to which proximal evaluations of quality of nursing care are related to distal social constructs of age, gender, race/ethnicity and SES to uncover evidence of privilege as well as prejudice in the care of hospitalized children. Over 400 children are currently enrolled in the study; the remaining 100 children will be enrolled by March, 2009. Results will point to areas where changes in nursing practice are required to ensure quality nursing care for all hospitalized children. References: Alderson, P., & Montgomery, J. (1996). Health care choices - Making decisions with children. London, Institute for Public Policy Research.; Chen, E., Matthews, K. A., & Boyce, W. T. (2002). "Socioeconomic differences in children's health: how and why do these relationships change with age? What are the implications for children ?" Psychological Bulletin 128: 295-329.; Cooper, L. A., & Roter, D. L. (2007). Patient -provider communication: The effect of race and ethnicity on process and outcomes of healthcare. Unequal treatment: confronting racial and ethnic disparities in health care. Institute of Medicine. Washington, DC, Institute of Medicine: 552-593.; Institute of Medicine (2003). Unequal treatment: Confronting racial and ethnic disparities in health care Washington, DC, Institute of Medicine.; Starfield, B., Robertson, J., & Riley, A. W. (2002). "Social class gradients and health in childhood." Ambulatory Pediatrics 2(4): 238-246.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Louisville, Kentucky, USA
Description:
"Magnet: Inspiring Innovation, Achieving Outcomes" was the theme and "Explore the relationship among leadership, innovation, and nursing practice outcomes" was the goal of the 13th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 1-3 October, 2009 in Louisville, Kentucky, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAre There Disparities in Parents' and Hospitalized Children's Perceptions of the Quality of Nursing Care?en_GB
dc.contributor.authorRyan-Wenger, Nancy A.en_US
dc.author.detailsNancy Ryan-Wenger, RN, PhD, CPNP, FAAN, Nationwide Children's Hospital, Columbus, Ohio, USA, email: nancy.ryanwenger@nationwidechildrens.orgen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182331-
dc.description.abstractResearch shows evidence of a social gradient in parents' perceptions of their children's health status, perhaps, in part, due to differences in the quality of care that is provided. This interdisciplinary cross-sectional study of 500 six- to 21-year-old hospitalized children examines the quality of nursing care from the children's and parents' perspectives for evidence of disparities across social constructs of age, gender, race/ethnicity, and socioeconomic status (SES). Structured interviews and systematic content analysis were used to obtain the children's and their parents' assessment of the quality of the children's nursing care. The sample is approximately 2/3 white and 1/3 African-American. SES was indirectly estimated by method of payment (private insurance vs public assistance), and by socioeconomic characteristics of the communities in which the families lived, including median household income, percent unemployed, and percent below the poverty line. The psychophysiological context in which the children responded was measured by quality of life, anxiety and depression scales. In the context of ecological development, our research will reveal the extent to which proximal evaluations of quality of nursing care are related to distal social constructs of age, gender, race/ethnicity and SES to uncover evidence of privilege as well as prejudice in the care of hospitalized children. Over 400 children are currently enrolled in the study; the remaining 100 children will be enrolled by March, 2009. Results will point to areas where changes in nursing practice are required to ensure quality nursing care for all hospitalized children. References: Alderson, P., & Montgomery, J. (1996). Health care choices - Making decisions with children. London, Institute for Public Policy Research.; Chen, E., Matthews, K. A., & Boyce, W. T. (2002). "Socioeconomic differences in children's health: how and why do these relationships change with age? What are the implications for children ?" Psychological Bulletin 128: 295-329.; Cooper, L. A., & Roter, D. L. (2007). Patient -provider communication: The effect of race and ethnicity on process and outcomes of healthcare. Unequal treatment: confronting racial and ethnic disparities in health care. Institute of Medicine. Washington, DC, Institute of Medicine: 552-593.; Institute of Medicine (2003). Unequal treatment: Confronting racial and ethnic disparities in health care Washington, DC, Institute of Medicine.; Starfield, B., Robertson, J., & Riley, A. W. (2002). "Social class gradients and health in childhood." Ambulatory Pediatrics 2(4): 238-246.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:19:32Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:19:32Z-
dc.conference.date2009en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationLouisville, Kentucky, USAen_US
dc.description"Magnet: Inspiring Innovation, Achieving Outcomes" was the theme and "Explore the relationship among leadership, innovation, and nursing practice outcomes" was the goal of the 13th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 1-3 October, 2009 in Louisville, Kentucky, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.