2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182341
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Nurse Manager Stress in Magnet and Non-Magnet Designated Hospitals
Author(s):
Stichler, Jaynelle
Author Details:
Jaynelle Stichler, DNSc, RN, FACHE, FAAN, Sharp Memorial Hospital, San Diego, California, USA, email: jstichler@aol.com
Abstract:
The literature is replete with evidence about the effects of the work environment on nurses job satisfaction and anticipated turnover. Magnet and other organizational cultures led by authentic and transformational leaders have been the stimulus to ensure a healthy work environment. What has not been studied is the effect of the Magnet culture on nurse manager stress. Nurse managers affect the work environment of clinical nurses (Shirey, 2006, Tomey, 2009). Nursing and industrial-organizational psychology research indicates that immediate supervisors profoundly affect organizational culture, climate and norms and buffer employees reactions to work stress (Kelloway, Sivanathan, Francis, & Barling, 2005). Nurse managers play a central role in the business and health outcomes of hospitals as the direct interface between healthcare executives and the nurses at the point of care. No other role experiences the competing expectations more than nurse managers who often are the least experienced in the hierarchy and subject to the stress of balancing organizational performance expectations with nurses, physicians, and patients demands. While there is evidence about the effect of Magnet on work environments and clinical nurses experience, little is known as to how Magnet affects the stress level of nurse managers. The results of this study address differences in the stress level of nurse manager in Magnet versus non-Magnet hospitals. The study is currently in data analysis and will be complete by May 2009. Preliminary analysis indicates that subjective stress levels were significantly lower for nurse managers in Magnet hospitals (N=32) as compared to non-Magnet hospitals (N=27). References: Kelloway, E. K., Sivanathan, N., Francis, L., & Barling, J. (2005). Poor leadership. In J. Barling, E. K. Kelloway & M. R. Frone (Eds.), Handbook of Work Stress (pp. 89-112). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications.; Kelloway, E. K., Sivanathan, N., Francis, L., & Barling, J. (2005). Poor leadership. In J. Barling, E. K. Kelloway & M. R. Frone (Eds.), Handbook of Work Stress (pp. 89-112). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications.; Kozlowski, S. W. J., Brown, K. G., Weissbein, D. A., Cannon-Bowers, J. A., & Salas, E. (2000). A multilevel approach to training effectiveness: Enhancing horizontal and vertical transfer. In K. J. Klein & S. W. J. Kozlowski (Eds.), Multilevel theory, research, and methods in organizations: Foundations, extensions, and new directions (pp. 157-210). San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.; Tomey, A. M. (2009). Nursing leadership and management effects work environments. Journal of Nursing Management, 17, 15-25.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Louisville, Kentucky, USA
Description:
"Magnet: Inspiring Innovation, Achieving Outcomes" was the theme and "Explore the relationship among leadership, innovation, and nursing practice outcomes" was the goal of the 13th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 1-3 October, 2009 in Louisville, Kentucky, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNurse Manager Stress in Magnet and Non-Magnet Designated Hospitalsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorStichler, Jaynelleen_US
dc.author.detailsJaynelle Stichler, DNSc, RN, FACHE, FAAN, Sharp Memorial Hospital, San Diego, California, USA, email: jstichler@aol.comen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182341-
dc.description.abstractThe literature is replete with evidence about the effects of the work environment on nurses job satisfaction and anticipated turnover. Magnet and other organizational cultures led by authentic and transformational leaders have been the stimulus to ensure a healthy work environment. What has not been studied is the effect of the Magnet culture on nurse manager stress. Nurse managers affect the work environment of clinical nurses (Shirey, 2006, Tomey, 2009). Nursing and industrial-organizational psychology research indicates that immediate supervisors profoundly affect organizational culture, climate and norms and buffer employees reactions to work stress (Kelloway, Sivanathan, Francis, & Barling, 2005). Nurse managers play a central role in the business and health outcomes of hospitals as the direct interface between healthcare executives and the nurses at the point of care. No other role experiences the competing expectations more than nurse managers who often are the least experienced in the hierarchy and subject to the stress of balancing organizational performance expectations with nurses, physicians, and patients demands. While there is evidence about the effect of Magnet on work environments and clinical nurses experience, little is known as to how Magnet affects the stress level of nurse managers. The results of this study address differences in the stress level of nurse manager in Magnet versus non-Magnet hospitals. The study is currently in data analysis and will be complete by May 2009. Preliminary analysis indicates that subjective stress levels were significantly lower for nurse managers in Magnet hospitals (N=32) as compared to non-Magnet hospitals (N=27). References: Kelloway, E. K., Sivanathan, N., Francis, L., & Barling, J. (2005). Poor leadership. In J. Barling, E. K. Kelloway & M. R. Frone (Eds.), Handbook of Work Stress (pp. 89-112). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications.; Kelloway, E. K., Sivanathan, N., Francis, L., & Barling, J. (2005). Poor leadership. In J. Barling, E. K. Kelloway & M. R. Frone (Eds.), Handbook of Work Stress (pp. 89-112). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications.; Kozlowski, S. W. J., Brown, K. G., Weissbein, D. A., Cannon-Bowers, J. A., & Salas, E. (2000). A multilevel approach to training effectiveness: Enhancing horizontal and vertical transfer. In K. J. Klein & S. W. J. Kozlowski (Eds.), Multilevel theory, research, and methods in organizations: Foundations, extensions, and new directions (pp. 157-210). San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.; Tomey, A. M. (2009). Nursing leadership and management effects work environments. Journal of Nursing Management, 17, 15-25.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:19:58Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:19:58Z-
dc.conference.date2009en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationLouisville, Kentucky, USAen_US
dc.description"Magnet: Inspiring Innovation, Achieving Outcomes" was the theme and "Explore the relationship among leadership, innovation, and nursing practice outcomes" was the goal of the 13th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 1-3 October, 2009 in Louisville, Kentucky, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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