2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182346
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Save Our Heels
Author(s):
Tweddell, Monica
Author Details:
Monica Tweddell, RN, WCC, Providence Holy Cross Medical Center, Mission Hills, California, USA, email: Monica.Tweddell@providence.org
Abstract:
Heel pressure ulcers develop as a result of pressure, shear or friction concentrated on a small area over a bony prominence that lacks subcutaneous tissue. Heel pressure ulcers contribute to increased cost, increased length of stay and physical disability to patients. Examination of our current practice and data indicated a significant opportunity for improvement related to the prevention of heel ulcers in the orthopedic patient population. Zero tolerance for preventable heel pressure ulcers was our goal utilizing best-practice guidelines. Pressure ulcer incidence was chosen as one of our nurse sensitive indicators for Magnet and as a measure of staffing effectiveness for Joint Commission reporting. It is a quality measure reported through multiple hospital committees. The project was instituted on the Orthopedic Unit consisting of twenty beds. Team composition included the Nurse Manager, Assistant Nurse Manager, designated orthopedic staff nurse and nursing assistant, Certified Wound Specialist, MedSurg Educator, an orthopedic surgeon and his physician assistant partners. Initial project included increased education to the Ortho-Unit and overflow units. A mandatory newsletter with a post test was distributed and returned to the Wound Nurse for review. Daily heel checks were performed using mirrors. Heel pressure ulcer prevention devices were introduced along with extensive education on correct placement of heel devices and pillows. Eighteen months post implementation of this project the orthopedic unit has not experienced any reportable or staged heel pressure ulcers. Consistent vigilance to patient's heels has led to consistent improvement with no heel pressure wounds to present.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Louisville, Kentucky, USA
Description:
"Magnet: Inspiring Innovation, Achieving Outcomes" was the theme and "Explore the relationship among leadership, innovation, and nursing practice outcomes" was the goal of the 13th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 1-3 October, 2009 in Louisville, Kentucky, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSave Our Heelsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorTweddell, Monicaen_US
dc.author.detailsMonica Tweddell, RN, WCC, Providence Holy Cross Medical Center, Mission Hills, California, USA, email: Monica.Tweddell@providence.orgen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182346-
dc.description.abstractHeel pressure ulcers develop as a result of pressure, shear or friction concentrated on a small area over a bony prominence that lacks subcutaneous tissue. Heel pressure ulcers contribute to increased cost, increased length of stay and physical disability to patients. Examination of our current practice and data indicated a significant opportunity for improvement related to the prevention of heel ulcers in the orthopedic patient population. Zero tolerance for preventable heel pressure ulcers was our goal utilizing best-practice guidelines. Pressure ulcer incidence was chosen as one of our nurse sensitive indicators for Magnet and as a measure of staffing effectiveness for Joint Commission reporting. It is a quality measure reported through multiple hospital committees. The project was instituted on the Orthopedic Unit consisting of twenty beds. Team composition included the Nurse Manager, Assistant Nurse Manager, designated orthopedic staff nurse and nursing assistant, Certified Wound Specialist, MedSurg Educator, an orthopedic surgeon and his physician assistant partners. Initial project included increased education to the Ortho-Unit and overflow units. A mandatory newsletter with a post test was distributed and returned to the Wound Nurse for review. Daily heel checks were performed using mirrors. Heel pressure ulcer prevention devices were introduced along with extensive education on correct placement of heel devices and pillows. Eighteen months post implementation of this project the orthopedic unit has not experienced any reportable or staged heel pressure ulcers. Consistent vigilance to patient's heels has led to consistent improvement with no heel pressure wounds to present.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:20:12Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:20:12Z-
dc.conference.date2009en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationLouisville, Kentucky, USAen_US
dc.description"Magnet: Inspiring Innovation, Achieving Outcomes" was the theme and "Explore the relationship among leadership, innovation, and nursing practice outcomes" was the goal of the 13th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 1-3 October, 2009 in Louisville, Kentucky, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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