2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182350
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Crash Course: Resuscitating the Code Blue Process
Author(s):
Winokur, Elizabeth
Author Details:
Elizabeth Winokur, RN, MSN, CEN, St. Joseph Hospital, Orange, California, USA, email: beth.winokur@stjoe.org
Abstract:
As a low volume, high risk activity, in-hospital resuscitations require optimal performance from team members. In 2007, record review found 70% lacked sufficient data to determine ACLS protocol compliance and several contained protocol deviations. The Code Blue Committee developed Crash Course. Designed for RN members of the team (designated critical care/ED RNs), Crash Course aimed to: improve documentation, review current ACLS protocols, review new biphasic defibrillator, provide RNs with tools to respond to problematic situations (e.g., orders deviating from protocol). Simulated code blues were the primary teaching method. During 2-hour sessions, RNs receive brief introductions to code blue documentation and participate in several mock codes. In each, 4 to 5 RNs enact code team roles while others record; instructors role-play family members and physicians. Instructor coaching guides ACLS protocol compliance during simulations. Debriefings after each simulation promote review of protocol and documentation compliance. Approximately 200 RNs (> 90% possible staff) attended Crash Course during 2008. A review of December code blue documentation demonstrated 100% reviewable records with minimal errors and few deviations from ACLS protocol. Due to positive staff comments and research supporting loss of ACLS knowledge over time, Crash Course is now mandatory for code team RNs in years opposite ACLS recertification. Crash Course has led to significant improvements in resuscitation documentation and staff behaviors in our facility. Requiring few material resources, it is easily transferrable to other institutions. As a result of changes made, additional interventions targeted at physicians are planned.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Louisville, Kentucky, USA
Description:
"Magnet: Inspiring Innovation, Achieving Outcomes" was the theme and "Explore the relationship among leadership, innovation, and nursing practice outcomes" was the goal of the 13th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 1-3 October, 2009 in Louisville, Kentucky, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCrash Course: Resuscitating the Code Blue Processen_GB
dc.contributor.authorWinokur, Elizabethen_US
dc.author.detailsElizabeth Winokur, RN, MSN, CEN, St. Joseph Hospital, Orange, California, USA, email: beth.winokur@stjoe.orgen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182350-
dc.description.abstractAs a low volume, high risk activity, in-hospital resuscitations require optimal performance from team members. In 2007, record review found 70% lacked sufficient data to determine ACLS protocol compliance and several contained protocol deviations. The Code Blue Committee developed Crash Course. Designed for RN members of the team (designated critical care/ED RNs), Crash Course aimed to: improve documentation, review current ACLS protocols, review new biphasic defibrillator, provide RNs with tools to respond to problematic situations (e.g., orders deviating from protocol). Simulated code blues were the primary teaching method. During 2-hour sessions, RNs receive brief introductions to code blue documentation and participate in several mock codes. In each, 4 to 5 RNs enact code team roles while others record; instructors role-play family members and physicians. Instructor coaching guides ACLS protocol compliance during simulations. Debriefings after each simulation promote review of protocol and documentation compliance. Approximately 200 RNs (> 90% possible staff) attended Crash Course during 2008. A review of December code blue documentation demonstrated 100% reviewable records with minimal errors and few deviations from ACLS protocol. Due to positive staff comments and research supporting loss of ACLS knowledge over time, Crash Course is now mandatory for code team RNs in years opposite ACLS recertification. Crash Course has led to significant improvements in resuscitation documentation and staff behaviors in our facility. Requiring few material resources, it is easily transferrable to other institutions. As a result of changes made, additional interventions targeted at physicians are planned.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:20:23Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:20:23Z-
dc.conference.date2009en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationLouisville, Kentucky, USAen_US
dc.description"Magnet: Inspiring Innovation, Achieving Outcomes" was the theme and "Explore the relationship among leadership, innovation, and nursing practice outcomes" was the goal of the 13th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 1-3 October, 2009 in Louisville, Kentucky, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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