2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182355
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Considering the Patient Point of View on Hand Hygiene: Implications for Nursing
Author(s):
Atherton, Sherri
Author Details:
Sherri Atherton, MS, RN, CNS, CIC, Infection Control CNS, Portland VA Medical, Portland, Oregon, USA, email: sherri.atherton@va.gov
Abstract:
Podium presentation, ANCC National Magnet Conference: Efforts to improve hand hygiene have included educating patients to request staff perform hand hygiene. An organization sought to identify if encouraging patients to ask staff to complete hand hygiene was an effective performance improvement intervention. A summer volunteer collaborated with Infection Control Clinical Nurse Specialists and nurses on one inpatient and one outpatient unit to trial two different methods to encourage patients to request hand hygiene before care. Baseline hand hygiene compliance was collected. Hand hygiene education was given to both patient groups on entry to the clinic or unit. Signs were posted to let staff know patients were watching for hand hygiene. Outpatient areas patients were provided an anonymous survey to record observations. Inpatients were interviewed by the student prior to discharge to collect observations. Patient surveys revealed reluctance to give feedback and an invalid belief staff was completing hand hygiene appropriately. Another theme identified was gratitude for care received. Follow-up hand hygiene monitors by the student in each area detected little improvement despite staff awareness of patient monitors. Findings were shared with each units nursing staff by the student and infection control. Nursing implications are being considered as nursing units redesign patient and nursing hand hygiene education tools. Infection Control shared results with leadership and will add to new employee orientation and routine education. This population characteristic increases the need for nursing hand hygiene accountability during care and a lower threshold to provide cues to other disciplines at the point of care when lapses are observed.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2010
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Phoenix, Arizona, USA
Description:
The 14th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 13-15 October, 2010 at the Phoenix Convention Center in Phoenix, Arizona, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleConsidering the Patient Point of View on Hand Hygiene: Implications for Nursingen_GB
dc.contributor.authorAtherton, Sherrien_US
dc.author.detailsSherri Atherton, MS, RN, CNS, CIC, Infection Control CNS, Portland VA Medical, Portland, Oregon, USA, email: sherri.atherton@va.goven_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182355-
dc.description.abstractPodium presentation, ANCC National Magnet Conference: Efforts to improve hand hygiene have included educating patients to request staff perform hand hygiene. An organization sought to identify if encouraging patients to ask staff to complete hand hygiene was an effective performance improvement intervention. A summer volunteer collaborated with Infection Control Clinical Nurse Specialists and nurses on one inpatient and one outpatient unit to trial two different methods to encourage patients to request hand hygiene before care. Baseline hand hygiene compliance was collected. Hand hygiene education was given to both patient groups on entry to the clinic or unit. Signs were posted to let staff know patients were watching for hand hygiene. Outpatient areas patients were provided an anonymous survey to record observations. Inpatients were interviewed by the student prior to discharge to collect observations. Patient surveys revealed reluctance to give feedback and an invalid belief staff was completing hand hygiene appropriately. Another theme identified was gratitude for care received. Follow-up hand hygiene monitors by the student in each area detected little improvement despite staff awareness of patient monitors. Findings were shared with each units nursing staff by the student and infection control. Nursing implications are being considered as nursing units redesign patient and nursing hand hygiene education tools. Infection Control shared results with leadership and will add to new employee orientation and routine education. This population characteristic increases the need for nursing hand hygiene accountability during care and a lower threshold to provide cues to other disciplines at the point of care when lapses are observed.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:20:37Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:20:37Z-
dc.conference.date2010en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationPhoenix, Arizona, USAen_US
dc.descriptionThe 14th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 13-15 October, 2010 at the Phoenix Convention Center in Phoenix, Arizona, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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