Increasing Diversity in the Nursing Profession: An Initiative that Supports and Sustains a Magnet Culture

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182356
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Increasing Diversity in the Nursing Profession: An Initiative that Supports and Sustains a Magnet Culture
Author(s):
Avalon, Earlene
Author Details:
Earlene Avalon, PhD, MPH, Director, Nursing Diversity Initiatives, Children's Hospital Boston, Boston, Massachusetts, USA, email: earlene.avalon@childrens.harvard.edu
Abstract:
Poster presentation, ANCC National Magnet Conference: According to the Sullivan Commission Report on Diversity in the Healthcare Workforce(1) and the Institutes of Medicine(2), increasing diversity in the healthcare workforce will improve access to quality healthcare services among the racially and ethnically diverse populations. However, the nursing workforce in our state has far too little resemblance to the diverse patient population it serves. To address this problem, the Chief Nursing Officer and other nursing leaders initiated an unprecedented effort in 2007 to strengthen the connection between nurses and multicultural families by creating the Nursing Career Lattice Program (NCLP). This program increases the number of nurses of color by addressing many of the barriers they face in their pursuit of a nursing career; the NCLP provides equitable access to financial and educational resources that are specifically reserved for diverse populations. The impetus of the NCLP was the Dept. of HHS Office of Minority Health CLAS Standards which stress the importance of implementing recruitment strategies and providing educational opportunities to promote a culturally and linguistically diverse staff. At the conclusion of the pilot phase of the program, 38% of the employees are currently enrolled in nursing school, 14% completed nursing school, 29% are completing their prerequisite courses and 14% submitted their nursing school applications. The Nursing Career Lattice Program is an example of how employing elements of Magnetism - specifically the importance of diversity, preceptorship, and an emphasis on professional development - can lead to outcomes that support and sustain a Magnet culture and thus perpetuate excellence in nursing.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2010
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Phoenix, Arizona, USA
Description:
The 14th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 13-15 October, 2010 at the Phoenix Convention Center in Phoenix, Arizona, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleIncreasing Diversity in the Nursing Profession: An Initiative that Supports and Sustains a Magnet Cultureen_GB
dc.contributor.authorAvalon, Earleneen_US
dc.author.detailsEarlene Avalon, PhD, MPH, Director, Nursing Diversity Initiatives, Children's Hospital Boston, Boston, Massachusetts, USA, email: earlene.avalon@childrens.harvard.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182356-
dc.description.abstractPoster presentation, ANCC National Magnet Conference: According to the Sullivan Commission Report on Diversity in the Healthcare Workforce(1) and the Institutes of Medicine(2), increasing diversity in the healthcare workforce will improve access to quality healthcare services among the racially and ethnically diverse populations. However, the nursing workforce in our state has far too little resemblance to the diverse patient population it serves. To address this problem, the Chief Nursing Officer and other nursing leaders initiated an unprecedented effort in 2007 to strengthen the connection between nurses and multicultural families by creating the Nursing Career Lattice Program (NCLP). This program increases the number of nurses of color by addressing many of the barriers they face in their pursuit of a nursing career; the NCLP provides equitable access to financial and educational resources that are specifically reserved for diverse populations. The impetus of the NCLP was the Dept. of HHS Office of Minority Health CLAS Standards which stress the importance of implementing recruitment strategies and providing educational opportunities to promote a culturally and linguistically diverse staff. At the conclusion of the pilot phase of the program, 38% of the employees are currently enrolled in nursing school, 14% completed nursing school, 29% are completing their prerequisite courses and 14% submitted their nursing school applications. The Nursing Career Lattice Program is an example of how employing elements of Magnetism - specifically the importance of diversity, preceptorship, and an emphasis on professional development - can lead to outcomes that support and sustain a Magnet culture and thus perpetuate excellence in nursing.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:20:39Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:20:39Z-
dc.conference.date2010en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationPhoenix, Arizona, USAen_US
dc.descriptionThe 14th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 13-15 October, 2010 at the Phoenix Convention Center in Phoenix, Arizona, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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