2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182359
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Nursing Peer Review: Pathway to Improving Practice
Author(s):
Barrett, Roseann
Author Details:
Roseann Barrett, PhD, RN, Director of Nursing Quality & Research, St. Joseph Hospital, Nashua, New Hampshire, USA, email: rbarrett@sjhnh.org
Abstract:
Podium presentation, ANCC National Magnet Conference: Formal, incident based peer review of nursing practice is an important strategy to enhance direct care nurses professional accountability for the quality of care provided. Peer review enables nurses to evaluate the delivery of nursing care in an objective manner and to develop solutions to improve existing processes, practices, and performances (Bry, Stettner, & Marks, 2006). As part of our shared governance structure for nursing quality improvement and evidence based-practice, the Nursing Quality Council, a two level system of Nursing Practice Review (NPR) was developed in order to assist direct-care nurses to review and analyze patient care events that may involve issues related to professional nursing practice and identify strategies for improvement. Evidence from the medical record, professional standards of practice, policies, evidence-based practice guidelines and nursing research are used to determine if the referred patient care event represents a deviation from standards of practice, reflects process problems, or an individual performance deficit. Fourteen nursing practice reviews were conducted from January through December 2009. Nursing practice was examined in order to identify nursing issues that may have been related to the patient care events. It was determined by the Council that four of the events reviewed did not involve nursing practice issues. Of the remaining ten events, the most commonly identified nursing issues were related to communication, critical thinking, assessment, planning, and resource utilization. Each review resulted in recommendations for improvement and education for individual nurses, specific units, or organization wide initiatives to improve patient safety and nursing quality.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2010
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Phoenix, Arizona, USA
Description:
The 14th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 13-15 October, 2010 at the Phoenix Convention Center in Phoenix, Arizona, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNursing Peer Review: Pathway to Improving Practiceen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBarrett, Roseannen_US
dc.author.detailsRoseann Barrett, PhD, RN, Director of Nursing Quality & Research, St. Joseph Hospital, Nashua, New Hampshire, USA, email: rbarrett@sjhnh.orgen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182359-
dc.description.abstractPodium presentation, ANCC National Magnet Conference: Formal, incident based peer review of nursing practice is an important strategy to enhance direct care nurses professional accountability for the quality of care provided. Peer review enables nurses to evaluate the delivery of nursing care in an objective manner and to develop solutions to improve existing processes, practices, and performances (Bry, Stettner, & Marks, 2006). As part of our shared governance structure for nursing quality improvement and evidence based-practice, the Nursing Quality Council, a two level system of Nursing Practice Review (NPR) was developed in order to assist direct-care nurses to review and analyze patient care events that may involve issues related to professional nursing practice and identify strategies for improvement. Evidence from the medical record, professional standards of practice, policies, evidence-based practice guidelines and nursing research are used to determine if the referred patient care event represents a deviation from standards of practice, reflects process problems, or an individual performance deficit. Fourteen nursing practice reviews were conducted from January through December 2009. Nursing practice was examined in order to identify nursing issues that may have been related to the patient care events. It was determined by the Council that four of the events reviewed did not involve nursing practice issues. Of the remaining ten events, the most commonly identified nursing issues were related to communication, critical thinking, assessment, planning, and resource utilization. Each review resulted in recommendations for improvement and education for individual nurses, specific units, or organization wide initiatives to improve patient safety and nursing quality.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:20:47Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:20:47Z-
dc.conference.date2010en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationPhoenix, Arizona, USAen_US
dc.descriptionThe 14th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 13-15 October, 2010 at the Phoenix Convention Center in Phoenix, Arizona, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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