2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182363
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Early Recognition and Treatment of Sepsis Utilizing a Nurse Practitioner Driven Protocol
Author(s):
Bell-Gordon, Charyl
Author Details:
Charyl Bell-Gordon, RN, MA, CEN, FNP, Director, Nurse Practitioner Program, The Methodist Hospital, Houston, Texas, USA, email: crbellgordon@tmhs.org
Abstract:
Poster presentation, ANCC National Magnet Conference: Our organization was able to significantly decrease ICU admissions and preventable sepsis related mortality by implementing a Nurse Practitioner (NP) driven protocol for the early recognition and treatment of sepsis. The United States is reported to have approximately 750,000 cases of sepsis per year resulting in 215,000 deaths. Sepsis is said to be the 10th leading cause of death in the United States with an annual cost of 17 billion dollars. Our facility formed an interdisciplinary taskforce which included but is not limited to: nurse leaders, nurse practitioners, critical care intensivists, internists, pharmacists, infectious disease specialists and performance improvement specialists to address this growing concern. Sepsis screening was one of the four task groups created to address sepsis within our organization. Recognizing that patients transferred into our facility comprised a large portion of those that had significant sepsis mortality, that patient population became a primary focus. The secondary population included patients admitted via the Emergency Department. Utilizing an electronic Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome (SIRS) screening tool that was created by one of our intensivists, the Nurse Practitioners began to screen the target patient populations. The screening tool has not only identified SIRS and sepsis but has also indicated when other acute conditions are present. When a positive SIRS score is identified, the NP conducts a more comprehensive assessment to determine if in fact she feels that patient is septic. When sepsis is identified, the NP immediately initiates treatment based on approved protocols.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2010
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Phoenix, Arizona, USA
Description:
The 14th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 13-15 October, 2010 at the Phoenix Convention Center in Phoenix, Arizona, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEarly Recognition and Treatment of Sepsis Utilizing a Nurse Practitioner Driven Protocolen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBell-Gordon, Charylen_US
dc.author.detailsCharyl Bell-Gordon, RN, MA, CEN, FNP, Director, Nurse Practitioner Program, The Methodist Hospital, Houston, Texas, USA, email: crbellgordon@tmhs.orgen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182363-
dc.description.abstractPoster presentation, ANCC National Magnet Conference: Our organization was able to significantly decrease ICU admissions and preventable sepsis related mortality by implementing a Nurse Practitioner (NP) driven protocol for the early recognition and treatment of sepsis. The United States is reported to have approximately 750,000 cases of sepsis per year resulting in 215,000 deaths. Sepsis is said to be the 10th leading cause of death in the United States with an annual cost of 17 billion dollars. Our facility formed an interdisciplinary taskforce which included but is not limited to: nurse leaders, nurse practitioners, critical care intensivists, internists, pharmacists, infectious disease specialists and performance improvement specialists to address this growing concern. Sepsis screening was one of the four task groups created to address sepsis within our organization. Recognizing that patients transferred into our facility comprised a large portion of those that had significant sepsis mortality, that patient population became a primary focus. The secondary population included patients admitted via the Emergency Department. Utilizing an electronic Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome (SIRS) screening tool that was created by one of our intensivists, the Nurse Practitioners began to screen the target patient populations. The screening tool has not only identified SIRS and sepsis but has also indicated when other acute conditions are present. When a positive SIRS score is identified, the NP conducts a more comprehensive assessment to determine if in fact she feels that patient is septic. When sepsis is identified, the NP immediately initiates treatment based on approved protocols.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:20:58Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:20:58Z-
dc.conference.date2010en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationPhoenix, Arizona, USAen_US
dc.descriptionThe 14th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 13-15 October, 2010 at the Phoenix Convention Center in Phoenix, Arizona, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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