2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182366
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Courting and Keeping Graduate Nurses: The Role of the Professional Nurse Development Coordinator
Author(s):
Whitmer, Karen
Author Details:
Karen Whitmer, BS, RN, ONC, PinnacleHealth System, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, USA, email: kwhitmer@pinnaclehealth.org
Abstract:
Podium Presentation: BRIEF DESCRIPTION: This session will present a two-pronged approach to recruitment and retention that has resulted in a 90% or higher retention rate of graduate nurses. A Nurse Extern Program and the role of the Professional Nurse Development Coordinator will be described in order to illustrate the importance of mentoring and socializing graduate nurses to improve retention. ABSTRACT: Recruitment of nursing students and graduate nurses into bedside nursing positions is a significant challenge faced by budget conscious nurse administrators throughout the nation. This session will describe how one health system recruits and mentors future nurses while they are still nursing students through the implementation of a Nurse Extern Program. Additionally, the presenter will describe how a health system created an innovative Professional Nurse Development Coordinator (PNDC) role to recruit, develop, and mentor new graduate nurses throughout the first year of their career. The success of this two-pronged approach has been staggering. While hospitals across the country are reporting turnover rates of new graduate nurses between 35 and 60 percent, since the inception of the PNDC role in 2002, this health system has enjoyed at least a 90% retention rate of graduate nurses in the first year of practice. Approximately 75% of the 100 graduate nurses who are hired each year are recruited through the Nurse Extern Program where they are provided flexible schedules to work as Patient Care Assistants. The Nurse Externs gain valuable clinical experience and build a foundation for successful transition to the graduate nurse role. Once committed to the graduate nurse position, Nurse Externs in their final semester of nursing school are permitted to shadow an RN on the unit of their choice for 50% of their work time. This partnership offers a rich opportunity for mentoring and building relationships. The network of support built around the graduate nurse during the first year of practice by the PNDC also contributes to the high retention rate. In collaboration with Human Resources, the Nurse Manager, the staff development instructor, and the preceptor, the PNDC facilitates the smooth transition from student nurse to graduate nurse. The PNDC coordinates biweekly education sessions that provide opportunities for socialization and support. The Forces of Magnetism are strongly represented in this well-designed approach to recruitment and retention. Not only has the retention rate improved, the RN vacancy rate is 6%. This program has had many positive outcomes: huge cost-savings through RN retention, increasing patient safety by retaining experienced staff, and improving RN satisfaction by reducing vacancy rates. The Nurse Extern Program, in concert with the role of the PNDC, facilitates a Magnet culture that attracts and retains nurses.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2008
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Salt Lake City, Utah, USA
Description:
The 12th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 15-17 October, 2008 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCourting and Keeping Graduate Nurses: The Role of the Professional Nurse Development Coordinatoren_GB
dc.contributor.authorWhitmer, Karenen_US
dc.author.detailsKaren Whitmer, BS, RN, ONC, PinnacleHealth System, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, USA, email: kwhitmer@pinnaclehealth.orgen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182366-
dc.description.abstractPodium Presentation: BRIEF DESCRIPTION: This session will present a two-pronged approach to recruitment and retention that has resulted in a 90% or higher retention rate of graduate nurses. A Nurse Extern Program and the role of the Professional Nurse Development Coordinator will be described in order to illustrate the importance of mentoring and socializing graduate nurses to improve retention. ABSTRACT: Recruitment of nursing students and graduate nurses into bedside nursing positions is a significant challenge faced by budget conscious nurse administrators throughout the nation. This session will describe how one health system recruits and mentors future nurses while they are still nursing students through the implementation of a Nurse Extern Program. Additionally, the presenter will describe how a health system created an innovative Professional Nurse Development Coordinator (PNDC) role to recruit, develop, and mentor new graduate nurses throughout the first year of their career. The success of this two-pronged approach has been staggering. While hospitals across the country are reporting turnover rates of new graduate nurses between 35 and 60 percent, since the inception of the PNDC role in 2002, this health system has enjoyed at least a 90% retention rate of graduate nurses in the first year of practice. Approximately 75% of the 100 graduate nurses who are hired each year are recruited through the Nurse Extern Program where they are provided flexible schedules to work as Patient Care Assistants. The Nurse Externs gain valuable clinical experience and build a foundation for successful transition to the graduate nurse role. Once committed to the graduate nurse position, Nurse Externs in their final semester of nursing school are permitted to shadow an RN on the unit of their choice for 50% of their work time. This partnership offers a rich opportunity for mentoring and building relationships. The network of support built around the graduate nurse during the first year of practice by the PNDC also contributes to the high retention rate. In collaboration with Human Resources, the Nurse Manager, the staff development instructor, and the preceptor, the PNDC facilitates the smooth transition from student nurse to graduate nurse. The PNDC coordinates biweekly education sessions that provide opportunities for socialization and support. The Forces of Magnetism are strongly represented in this well-designed approach to recruitment and retention. Not only has the retention rate improved, the RN vacancy rate is 6%. This program has had many positive outcomes: huge cost-savings through RN retention, increasing patient safety by retaining experienced staff, and improving RN satisfaction by reducing vacancy rates. The Nurse Extern Program, in concert with the role of the PNDC, facilitates a Magnet culture that attracts and retains nurses.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:21:06Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:21:06Z-
dc.conference.date2008en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationSalt Lake City, Utah, USAen_US
dc.descriptionThe 12th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 15-17 October, 2008 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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