2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182368
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Age is Everything: Building a Retention Plan Based on Generation Characteristics
Author(s):
Wilmoth, Michele; Sadie, Christine
Author Details:
Michele Wilmoth, BSN, RN, Akron Children's Hospital, Akron, Ohio, USA, email: mwilmoth@chmca.org; Christine Sadie, BSN, RN
Abstract:
Podium Presentation: BRIEF DESCRIPTION: This session will describe the innovative process of building and evaluating a strategic nurse retention plan based on generational characteristics through a shared governance model. ABSTRACT: Creating a plan for overall nurse retention, organizations must look across all generations, recognizing each group's characteristic differences as strengths to be valued. Literature review on the drivers of retention based on generational characteristics was conducted and findings evaluated against our current retention strategies. Shared Governance Council discussion revealed that many of the generational concerns discussed in the literature (both those common across the generational spectrum as well as those specific to individual generations) were present among our nurses. When a Task Force began the process of identifying measurable initiatives to meet the concerns identified by the literature, it became apparent that a more thorough 'generational approach' was a necessary first step. Understanding the makeup of the current workforce is also a critical step in the early development stage of retention plans. For example, implementing a retention strategy such as 'flexible scheduling' can appear on the surface to address the work-life-balance needs of all generations. What is important to consider is how the term 'flexible scheduling' is perceived among each generation; Gen-X'ers and Y'ers may define it as days of work, whereas Baby Boomers/Traditionalists may focus instead on a reduction in hours worked per day. Considering the generational age when developing assessment measures will provide a solid foundation upon which to build a successful retention plan. Equally important is establishing a multi-generational task force to share in the collaborative process of building your strategic plan. Shared governance is the ideal mechanism to ensuring all have an equal voice in the process. Implementation strategies for a Baby Boomer dominated workforce may be quite different from that of a predominant Gen-Y workforce. Carefully considering and understanding the commonalities and uniqueness of each generation is crucial to building and retaining a strong nursing workforce across all ages. REFERENCES: Auerbach, David I., Buerhaus, Peter I. and Staiger, Douglas, O. Four-Part Series on Aging RN Workforce, Nursing Economics, 2000. Billings, D. & Kowalski, K. (2004). Teaching learners from varied generations. The Journal of Continuing Education in Nursing, 35(3), 104-105. Gantz Wiley Research (March 28, 2006) Work Trends Study. "Survey finds Gen X are high flight risk." Letvak, Susan. Retaining the Older Nurse, JONA, July/Aug 2002. Martin, C.A. (2004). Bridging the generation gap(s). Nursing 2004, 34 (12), 62-63. Nevidjon, B., Erickson, J. (January 31, 2001). "The Nursing Shortage: Solutions for the Short and Long Term" Online Journal of Issues in Nursing. Vol #6, No#1.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2008
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Salt Lake City, Utah, USA
Description:
The 12th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 15-17 October, 2008 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAge is Everything: Building a Retention Plan Based on Generation Characteristicsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorWilmoth, Micheleen_US
dc.contributor.authorSadie, Christineen_US
dc.author.detailsMichele Wilmoth, BSN, RN, Akron Children's Hospital, Akron, Ohio, USA, email: mwilmoth@chmca.org; Christine Sadie, BSN, RNen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182368-
dc.description.abstractPodium Presentation: BRIEF DESCRIPTION: This session will describe the innovative process of building and evaluating a strategic nurse retention plan based on generational characteristics through a shared governance model. ABSTRACT: Creating a plan for overall nurse retention, organizations must look across all generations, recognizing each group's characteristic differences as strengths to be valued. Literature review on the drivers of retention based on generational characteristics was conducted and findings evaluated against our current retention strategies. Shared Governance Council discussion revealed that many of the generational concerns discussed in the literature (both those common across the generational spectrum as well as those specific to individual generations) were present among our nurses. When a Task Force began the process of identifying measurable initiatives to meet the concerns identified by the literature, it became apparent that a more thorough 'generational approach' was a necessary first step. Understanding the makeup of the current workforce is also a critical step in the early development stage of retention plans. For example, implementing a retention strategy such as 'flexible scheduling' can appear on the surface to address the work-life-balance needs of all generations. What is important to consider is how the term 'flexible scheduling' is perceived among each generation; Gen-X'ers and Y'ers may define it as days of work, whereas Baby Boomers/Traditionalists may focus instead on a reduction in hours worked per day. Considering the generational age when developing assessment measures will provide a solid foundation upon which to build a successful retention plan. Equally important is establishing a multi-generational task force to share in the collaborative process of building your strategic plan. Shared governance is the ideal mechanism to ensuring all have an equal voice in the process. Implementation strategies for a Baby Boomer dominated workforce may be quite different from that of a predominant Gen-Y workforce. Carefully considering and understanding the commonalities and uniqueness of each generation is crucial to building and retaining a strong nursing workforce across all ages. REFERENCES: Auerbach, David I., Buerhaus, Peter I. and Staiger, Douglas, O. Four-Part Series on Aging RN Workforce, Nursing Economics, 2000. Billings, D. & Kowalski, K. (2004). Teaching learners from varied generations. The Journal of Continuing Education in Nursing, 35(3), 104-105. Gantz Wiley Research (March 28, 2006) Work Trends Study. "Survey finds Gen X are high flight risk." Letvak, Susan. Retaining the Older Nurse, JONA, July/Aug 2002. Martin, C.A. (2004). Bridging the generation gap(s). Nursing 2004, 34 (12), 62-63. Nevidjon, B., Erickson, J. (January 31, 2001). "The Nursing Shortage: Solutions for the Short and Long Term" Online Journal of Issues in Nursing. Vol #6, No#1.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:21:12Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:21:12Z-
dc.conference.date2008en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationSalt Lake City, Utah, USAen_US
dc.descriptionThe 12th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 15-17 October, 2008 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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