2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182371
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Comparison of Methods of Assessing Patient Body Weight in the Pediatric Emergency Department
Author(s):
Zink, Kelly
Author Details:
Kelly Zink, BSN, RN, Kosair Children's Hospital, Louisville, Kentucky, USA, email: kelly.zink@nortonhealthcare.org
Abstract:
Poster Presentation: The exact weight of a child undergoing resuscitation in a pediatric emergency department is critical to implementing protocols to save the child's life. Commonly, extenuating circumstances, such as consciousness and cooperativeness of the child, severity of illness or injury, stability of the child's condition, or temporary stabilizing equipment, preclude the assessment of the child's weight using a standard scale. The purpose of this study was to compare the accuracy of five methods of estimating a pediatric patient's body weight in the pediatric emergency department (ED). The five methods compared included a physician's estimate, a nurse's estimate, the patient's parent's estimate, the estimate using the Broselow tape, which is a recommended length-based method in the Pediatric Advanced Life Support (PALS) course, and the devised weight-estimation method (DWEM) which uses both length and body habitus to estimate weight. Accuracy was determined by comparing the five estimates with the patient's actual weight assessed using a standard weight scale. Parents of 127 non-emergent pediatric patients (0-17 years) in a single pediatric ED were approached during the triage assessment of their child. After receiving consent from the parent the research staff member asked the parent to estimate their child's weight. At the same time the research nurse estimated the body habitus of the child (slim, average or heavy) in order to employ the DWEM. The ED triage nurse then weighed the patient using a standard scale and measured the child's height. Without knowledge of any prior weight estimates or measures, the examination room nurse and attending physician separately estimated the child's weight. All five methods were highly accurate. The parent's estimate was the most accurate, but many of the subjects had just come from the pediatrician's office where the child was weighed. The physician and nurse estimates were the next most accurate, which could be due to the experience...[Please contact the primary investigator for more information about this poster presentation.] REFERENCES: American Academy of Pediatrics, American Heart Association (2006). Pediatric Advanced Life Support (PALS) Black, K, Barnett, P, Wolfe R, Young, S. (2002). Are methods used to estimate weight in children's accurate? Emerg Med 14: 160-5 Garland, JS, Kishaba, RG, Nelson, DB, Losek, JD, Sobocinski, KA. (1986). A rapid and accurate method of estimating body weight. Am. J. Emerg. Med., 4: 390-3. Lobstein T. Jackson-Leach R. (2007). Child overweight and obesity in the USA: prevalence rates according to IOTF definitions. International Journal of Pediatric Obesity. 2(1):62-4.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2008
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Salt Lake City, Utah, USA
Description:
The 12th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 15-17 October, 2008 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA Comparison of Methods of Assessing Patient Body Weight in the Pediatric Emergency Departmenten_GB
dc.contributor.authorZink, Kellyen_US
dc.author.detailsKelly Zink, BSN, RN, Kosair Children's Hospital, Louisville, Kentucky, USA, email: kelly.zink@nortonhealthcare.orgen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182371-
dc.description.abstractPoster Presentation: The exact weight of a child undergoing resuscitation in a pediatric emergency department is critical to implementing protocols to save the child's life. Commonly, extenuating circumstances, such as consciousness and cooperativeness of the child, severity of illness or injury, stability of the child's condition, or temporary stabilizing equipment, preclude the assessment of the child's weight using a standard scale. The purpose of this study was to compare the accuracy of five methods of estimating a pediatric patient's body weight in the pediatric emergency department (ED). The five methods compared included a physician's estimate, a nurse's estimate, the patient's parent's estimate, the estimate using the Broselow tape, which is a recommended length-based method in the Pediatric Advanced Life Support (PALS) course, and the devised weight-estimation method (DWEM) which uses both length and body habitus to estimate weight. Accuracy was determined by comparing the five estimates with the patient's actual weight assessed using a standard weight scale. Parents of 127 non-emergent pediatric patients (0-17 years) in a single pediatric ED were approached during the triage assessment of their child. After receiving consent from the parent the research staff member asked the parent to estimate their child's weight. At the same time the research nurse estimated the body habitus of the child (slim, average or heavy) in order to employ the DWEM. The ED triage nurse then weighed the patient using a standard scale and measured the child's height. Without knowledge of any prior weight estimates or measures, the examination room nurse and attending physician separately estimated the child's weight. All five methods were highly accurate. The parent's estimate was the most accurate, but many of the subjects had just come from the pediatrician's office where the child was weighed. The physician and nurse estimates were the next most accurate, which could be due to the experience...[Please contact the primary investigator for more information about this poster presentation.] REFERENCES: American Academy of Pediatrics, American Heart Association (2006). Pediatric Advanced Life Support (PALS) Black, K, Barnett, P, Wolfe R, Young, S. (2002). Are methods used to estimate weight in children's accurate? Emerg Med 14: 160-5 Garland, JS, Kishaba, RG, Nelson, DB, Losek, JD, Sobocinski, KA. (1986). A rapid and accurate method of estimating body weight. Am. J. Emerg. Med., 4: 390-3. Lobstein T. Jackson-Leach R. (2007). Child overweight and obesity in the USA: prevalence rates according to IOTF definitions. International Journal of Pediatric Obesity. 2(1):62-4.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:21:20Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:21:20Z-
dc.conference.date2008en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationSalt Lake City, Utah, USAen_US
dc.descriptionThe 12th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 15-17 October, 2008 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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