2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182373
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs Significantly Influences Nursing Retention
Author(s):
Adamczyk, Lauren
Author Details:
Lauren Adamczyk, RN, St. Peter's Hospital, Albany, New York, USA, email: LAdamczyk@Stpetershealthcare.org
Abstract:
BACKGROUND Hospital turnover costs range from 0.75 to 2.0 times the salary of the departing nurse. This approximates $64,000.00/per departure at one hospital or $2.56 million for every 40 nurses leaving within their first year! In addition, only 8% of 150 departing nurses participated in exit interviews. Thus, Recruitment and Retention committee responded to positively influence these results. METHODOLOGY A subgroup from Recruitment and Retention was formed and participated in communication and sensitivity training. When staff decides to leave, nursing managers contacted committee members. Using an interview tool, private RN:RN interviews were conducted. FINDINGS; 131 resignations occurred the past year with 54% participating in exit interviews. The majority of nurses decisions to leave relate to Maslows Hierarchy of Needs: 1. Biological and Physiological Needs - 22 % reported lack of time for meals 2. Safety Needs - 23 % reported lack of stability with preceptorship; 26 % reported lack of personal security related to nurse/patient ratio. 3. Belongingness Needs 30 % reported lack of mentorship; 25% reported lack of flexibility with scheduling, creating an imbalance with family life; 28% reported salary discrepancies across departments. 4. When hospitals fail to meet the first three levels of human need, self-esteem (level 4) and self actualization (level 5) are never attained and nurses leave. CONCLUSIONS: In response to these findings, the following changes were made: a. Reinforcement of meals by management b. Formal hospital-wide preceptorship program adopted c. Salary discrepancies addressed d. Mentorship program established
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Louisville, Kentucky, USA
Description:
"Magnet: Inspiring Innovation, Achieving Outcomes" was the theme and "Explore the relationship among leadership, innovation, and nursing practice outcomes" was the goal of the 13th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 1-3 October, 2009 in Louisville, Kentucky, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMaslow's Hierarchy of Needs Significantly Influences Nursing Retentionen_GB
dc.contributor.authorAdamczyk, Laurenen_US
dc.author.detailsLauren Adamczyk, RN, St. Peter's Hospital, Albany, New York, USA, email: LAdamczyk@Stpetershealthcare.orgen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182373-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND Hospital turnover costs range from 0.75 to 2.0 times the salary of the departing nurse. This approximates $64,000.00/per departure at one hospital or $2.56 million for every 40 nurses leaving within their first year! In addition, only 8% of 150 departing nurses participated in exit interviews. Thus, Recruitment and Retention committee responded to positively influence these results. METHODOLOGY A subgroup from Recruitment and Retention was formed and participated in communication and sensitivity training. When staff decides to leave, nursing managers contacted committee members. Using an interview tool, private RN:RN interviews were conducted. FINDINGS; 131 resignations occurred the past year with 54% participating in exit interviews. The majority of nurses decisions to leave relate to Maslows Hierarchy of Needs: 1. Biological and Physiological Needs - 22 % reported lack of time for meals 2. Safety Needs - 23 % reported lack of stability with preceptorship; 26 % reported lack of personal security related to nurse/patient ratio. 3. Belongingness Needs 30 % reported lack of mentorship; 25% reported lack of flexibility with scheduling, creating an imbalance with family life; 28% reported salary discrepancies across departments. 4. When hospitals fail to meet the first three levels of human need, self-esteem (level 4) and self actualization (level 5) are never attained and nurses leave. CONCLUSIONS: In response to these findings, the following changes were made: a. Reinforcement of meals by management b. Formal hospital-wide preceptorship program adopted c. Salary discrepancies addressed d. Mentorship program establisheden_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:21:25Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:21:25Z-
dc.conference.date2009en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationLouisville, Kentucky, USAen_US
dc.description"Magnet: Inspiring Innovation, Achieving Outcomes" was the theme and "Explore the relationship among leadership, innovation, and nursing practice outcomes" was the goal of the 13th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 1-3 October, 2009 in Louisville, Kentucky, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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