2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182392
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Implementing a Clinical Nurse Specialist on the Night Shift
Author(s):
Becker, Dawn
Author Details:
Dawn Becker, RN, York Hospital, York, Pennsylvania, USA, email: dbecker@wellspan.org
Abstract:
Background: Typically throughout health systems the night shift staff is the newer, less experienced staff. There are fewer resources leading to increased stress to the care giver, potential for errors, and a decrease in clinical knowledge. Purpose: The purpose for developing the night shift clinical nurse specialist (CNS) position is to alleviate some of the stress thereby decreasing errors and improving patient outcomes. By having a full-time resource on this shift the staff can call upon the CNS for anything from a changing patient condition to just plain troubleshooting of equipment. Method: The CNS rounds throughout the entire hospital nightly offering assistance, answering questions, and touching base with newer staff. The CNS is also used as a Rapid Response, Code, and Trauma team nurse. Education is also able to be provided in real time. As the CNS is assessing a patient for example, education is being provided about what the CNS is looking for and how to deal with a similar patient situation in the future. Please contact the primary investigator for more information. References: Assessing ICU Transfers at Night: A Call to Reduce Mortality and Readmission Risk, Peter E. Morris, MD, American Journal of Critical Care, Vol 18, No 1, pp 6-8.; Breaking Tradition A Night Shift Educator, Kathleen McCarthy, RN, BSN, CCRN, Critical Care Nurse Vol. 24, No. 3, June 2004; Peer-to-peer education: Nighttime is the right time, Rene L. Flagg, RN,C, CCRN, Arline Sparks, RN, BSN, CNA, Nursing Management, Vol. 34, No 5:42-43, May 2003; Transforming Care at the Bedside Designing New Care Systems in an Age of Complexity, Mary Viney, MSN, RN, Joyce BAtcheller, MSN, RN, Susan Houston, PhD, RN, CNAA, FAAN, Kim Belcik, BSN, RN, Journal of Nursing Care Quality, Vol 21, No. 2, pp.143-150.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Louisville, Kentucky, USA
Description:
"Magnet: Inspiring Innovation, Achieving Outcomes" was the theme and "Explore the relationship among leadership, innovation, and nursing practice outcomes" was the goal of the 13th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 1-3 October, 2009 in Louisville, Kentucky, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleImplementing a Clinical Nurse Specialist on the Night Shiften_GB
dc.contributor.authorBecker, Dawnen_US
dc.author.detailsDawn Becker, RN, York Hospital, York, Pennsylvania, USA, email: dbecker@wellspan.orgen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182392-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Typically throughout health systems the night shift staff is the newer, less experienced staff. There are fewer resources leading to increased stress to the care giver, potential for errors, and a decrease in clinical knowledge. Purpose: The purpose for developing the night shift clinical nurse specialist (CNS) position is to alleviate some of the stress thereby decreasing errors and improving patient outcomes. By having a full-time resource on this shift the staff can call upon the CNS for anything from a changing patient condition to just plain troubleshooting of equipment. Method: The CNS rounds throughout the entire hospital nightly offering assistance, answering questions, and touching base with newer staff. The CNS is also used as a Rapid Response, Code, and Trauma team nurse. Education is also able to be provided in real time. As the CNS is assessing a patient for example, education is being provided about what the CNS is looking for and how to deal with a similar patient situation in the future. Please contact the primary investigator for more information. References: Assessing ICU Transfers at Night: A Call to Reduce Mortality and Readmission Risk, Peter E. Morris, MD, American Journal of Critical Care, Vol 18, No 1, pp 6-8.; Breaking Tradition A Night Shift Educator, Kathleen McCarthy, RN, BSN, CCRN, Critical Care Nurse Vol. 24, No. 3, June 2004; Peer-to-peer education: Nighttime is the right time, Rene L. Flagg, RN,C, CCRN, Arline Sparks, RN, BSN, CNA, Nursing Management, Vol. 34, No 5:42-43, May 2003; Transforming Care at the Bedside Designing New Care Systems in an Age of Complexity, Mary Viney, MSN, RN, Joyce BAtcheller, MSN, RN, Susan Houston, PhD, RN, CNAA, FAAN, Kim Belcik, BSN, RN, Journal of Nursing Care Quality, Vol 21, No. 2, pp.143-150.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:22:16Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:22:16Z-
dc.conference.date2009en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationLouisville, Kentucky, USAen_US
dc.description"Magnet: Inspiring Innovation, Achieving Outcomes" was the theme and "Explore the relationship among leadership, innovation, and nursing practice outcomes" was the goal of the 13th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 1-3 October, 2009 in Louisville, Kentucky, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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