2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182401
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Innovations in Medication Safety in an Outpatient Setting Yield Positive Outcomes
Author(s):
Biewer, Deborah; Dahl, Sandra
Author Details:
Deborah Biewer, RN, BSN, Franklin Square Hospital Center, Baltimore, Maryland, USA, email: debbie.j.biewer@medstar.net; Sandra Dahl, BSN, MA, RN, NEA-BC, Franklin Square Hospital Center, Baltimore, Maryland, USA, email: perryhallnurse@verizon.net
Abstract:
Inconsistencies in medical administration practices between Registered Nurses and Certified Medical Assistants (CMA) were identified in our hospital. RNs new to the institution must pass a pharmacology exam prior to the start of work on their unit but CMAs did not. Medication safety content is not emphasized in local CMA programs. A literature review revealed little in the area of ensuring medication administration safety for CMAs. An outpatient-specific pharmacology exam was developed and reviewed by the Professional Development Department and the Nurse Educator Council. Newly hired CMAs are now required to take the CMA pharmacology exam prior to reporting for unit-based orientation. To pass, a score of 90% or better is required for the policy and information portion, and a score of 100% is required for the drug dose calculation portion. The educational program is now being taught to CMAs in 28 outpatient sites. Physicians and nurses are being educated to expect that all CMAs will verify and calculate medication orders and challenge the physicians if necessary. Outcomes of the educational program include all seven CMAs in the pilot passed the pharmacology exam on their first attempt. CMA staff in outpatient settings embraced the opportunity to attend medication educational sessions and will be sitting for the test over the next few months. Future goals of the program are to survey CMAs regarding their educational needs and survey physicians and nurses regarding their observations of the CMA medication safety practices. Medication errors involving CMAs will also be monitored. References: Buppert C. Understanding medical assistant practice liability issues. Dermatology Nursing, 20(4): 327-9, 2008.; Tache S., Chapman S. What a medical assistant can do for your practice. Family Practice Management, 12(4):51-4, Family Practice Management, April 2005.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Louisville, Kentucky, USA
Description:
"Magnet: Inspiring Innovation, Achieving Outcomes" was the theme and "Explore the relationship among leadership, innovation, and nursing practice outcomes" was the goal of the 13th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 1-3 October, 2009 in Louisville, Kentucky, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleInnovations in Medication Safety in an Outpatient Setting Yield Positive Outcomesen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBiewer, Deborahen_US
dc.contributor.authorDahl, Sandraen
dc.author.detailsDeborah Biewer, RN, BSN, Franklin Square Hospital Center, Baltimore, Maryland, USA, email: debbie.j.biewer@medstar.net; Sandra Dahl, BSN, MA, RN, NEA-BC, Franklin Square Hospital Center, Baltimore, Maryland, USA, email: perryhallnurse@verizon.neten_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182401en
dc.description.abstractInconsistencies in medical administration practices between Registered Nurses and Certified Medical Assistants (CMA) were identified in our hospital. RNs new to the institution must pass a pharmacology exam prior to the start of work on their unit but CMAs did not. Medication safety content is not emphasized in local CMA programs. A literature review revealed little in the area of ensuring medication administration safety for CMAs. An outpatient-specific pharmacology exam was developed and reviewed by the Professional Development Department and the Nurse Educator Council. Newly hired CMAs are now required to take the CMA pharmacology exam prior to reporting for unit-based orientation. To pass, a score of 90% or better is required for the policy and information portion, and a score of 100% is required for the drug dose calculation portion. The educational program is now being taught to CMAs in 28 outpatient sites. Physicians and nurses are being educated to expect that all CMAs will verify and calculate medication orders and challenge the physicians if necessary. Outcomes of the educational program include all seven CMAs in the pilot passed the pharmacology exam on their first attempt. CMA staff in outpatient settings embraced the opportunity to attend medication educational sessions and will be sitting for the test over the next few months. Future goals of the program are to survey CMAs regarding their educational needs and survey physicians and nurses regarding their observations of the CMA medication safety practices. Medication errors involving CMAs will also be monitored. References: Buppert C. Understanding medical assistant practice liability issues. Dermatology Nursing, 20(4): 327-9, 2008.; Tache S., Chapman S. What a medical assistant can do for your practice. Family Practice Management, 12(4):51-4, Family Practice Management, April 2005.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:22:38Zen
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:22:38Zen
dc.conference.date2009en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationLouisville, Kentucky, USAen_US
dc.description"Magnet: Inspiring Innovation, Achieving Outcomes" was the theme and "Explore the relationship among leadership, innovation, and nursing practice outcomes" was the goal of the 13th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 1-3 October, 2009 in Louisville, Kentucky, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.en
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