2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182411
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Simulation Technology: Building Critical Thinking Skills and Teamwork
Author(s):
Boyd, Tiffany
Author Details:
Tiffany Boyd, BSN, RN, PCCN, Pinnacle Health System-Harrisburg Hospital, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, USA, email: tboyd@pinnaclehealth.org
Abstract:
In the current healthcare environment, educators are challenged to provide innovative teaching methods that promote the professional development of staff nurses. A team of Staff Development Instructors and Clinical Nurse Specialists collaborated with the education department to incorporate simulation technology into annual education and competency assessment programs. Previous evaluations reflected that nurses prefer hands on learning or skill application over classroom lecture. The integration of simulation technology into competency programs provides an opportunity for nurses to increase communication, critical thinking and technical skills in a non-threatening environment. Simulation situations were developed and piloted by the team based on actual patient scenarios. Each simulation included learning objectives for critical assessment skills and interventions. A group of nurses participated in the simulation lab while another group of nurses observed via monitor. The observation group utilized a checklist of critical clinical and team behaviors to prompt discussion during debriefing with the entire group post simulation. Participants described simulation experiences as interactive, almost human-like, safe way to practice emergency care, which validated previous research. Anecdotal comments revealed that simulation provides a reality to learning and practice without the fear of harming someone. Incorporating simulation technology into education provides a realistic opportunity to practice skills, promote critical thinking and enhance teamwork and communication. Further research is needed to determine how simulation experience affects clinical judgment at point of care. The team has developed a research project to determine what impact the simulations have on critical thinking with our graduate nurses.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Louisville, Kentucky, USA
Description:
"Magnet: Inspiring Innovation, Achieving Outcomes" was the theme and "Explore the relationship among leadership, innovation, and nursing practice outcomes" was the goal of the 13th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 1-3 October, 2009 in Louisville, Kentucky, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSimulation Technology: Building Critical Thinking Skills and Teamworken_GB
dc.contributor.authorBoyd, Tiffanyen_US
dc.author.detailsTiffany Boyd, BSN, RN, PCCN, Pinnacle Health System-Harrisburg Hospital, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, USA, email: tboyd@pinnaclehealth.orgen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182411-
dc.description.abstractIn the current healthcare environment, educators are challenged to provide innovative teaching methods that promote the professional development of staff nurses. A team of Staff Development Instructors and Clinical Nurse Specialists collaborated with the education department to incorporate simulation technology into annual education and competency assessment programs. Previous evaluations reflected that nurses prefer hands on learning or skill application over classroom lecture. The integration of simulation technology into competency programs provides an opportunity for nurses to increase communication, critical thinking and technical skills in a non-threatening environment. Simulation situations were developed and piloted by the team based on actual patient scenarios. Each simulation included learning objectives for critical assessment skills and interventions. A group of nurses participated in the simulation lab while another group of nurses observed via monitor. The observation group utilized a checklist of critical clinical and team behaviors to prompt discussion during debriefing with the entire group post simulation. Participants described simulation experiences as interactive, almost human-like, safe way to practice emergency care, which validated previous research. Anecdotal comments revealed that simulation provides a reality to learning and practice without the fear of harming someone. Incorporating simulation technology into education provides a realistic opportunity to practice skills, promote critical thinking and enhance teamwork and communication. Further research is needed to determine how simulation experience affects clinical judgment at point of care. The team has developed a research project to determine what impact the simulations have on critical thinking with our graduate nurses.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:23:03Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:23:03Z-
dc.conference.date2009en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationLouisville, Kentucky, USAen_US
dc.description"Magnet: Inspiring Innovation, Achieving Outcomes" was the theme and "Explore the relationship among leadership, innovation, and nursing practice outcomes" was the goal of the 13th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 1-3 October, 2009 in Louisville, Kentucky, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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