2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182414
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Impact of the Use of Battery-Operated Toothbrushes for Intubated Patients
Author(s):
Brames, Nancy
Author Details:
Nancy Brames, RN, MSN, ACNS-BC, Barnes-Jewish Hospital, St. Louis, Missouri, USA, email: neb3116@bjc.org
Abstract:
Background/Significance: Studies have shown that brushing the teeth of intubated patients as part of an oral care protocol has significantly decreased the incidence of Ventilator Associated Pneumonia. However, the ease of brushing the teeth of a patient with an endotracheal tube may affect the frequency that this task is performed. Method: A descriptive study using pre- and post-study surveys was conducted in 3 ICUs. The pre-study survey was completed by 113 RNs; of those, 77 (68%) returned the post-study survey. Following the return of pre-study surveys, RNs used battery-operated toothbrushes with their intubated patients for 4 months before completing the post-study survey. Descriptive statistics were used to examine participants responses. The t-test was applied for group comparisons when appropriate. Results: Statistically significant increases in all questions regarding frequency, ease, effectiveness, and satisfaction were noted (alpha = 0.05). The study showed 67.6% of RNs brushed teeth of intubated patients at least once per shift > 60% of the time with a battery-operated toothbrush compared to 48.7% with manual toothbrushes. Battery-operated toothbrushes were rated effective to very effective by 60.8% of RNs compared to 11.5% for manual toothbrushes. The battery operated toothbrush was rated somewhat to much easier to use by 77% of RNs; 84.1% preferred battery-operated toothbrushes. Conclusions: RNs feel using a battery-operated toothbrush for oral care on intubated patients is easier, more effective and increases frequency of oral care than with a manual toothbrush. The hospital now provides battery-operated toothbrushes for all intubated patients.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Louisville, Kentucky, USA
Description:
"Magnet: Inspiring Innovation, Achieving Outcomes" was the theme and "Explore the relationship among leadership, innovation, and nursing practice outcomes" was the goal of the 13th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 1-3 October, 2009 in Louisville, Kentucky, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleImpact of the Use of Battery-Operated Toothbrushes for Intubated Patientsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBrames, Nancyen_US
dc.author.detailsNancy Brames, RN, MSN, ACNS-BC, Barnes-Jewish Hospital, St. Louis, Missouri, USA, email: neb3116@bjc.orgen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182414-
dc.description.abstractBackground/Significance: Studies have shown that brushing the teeth of intubated patients as part of an oral care protocol has significantly decreased the incidence of Ventilator Associated Pneumonia. However, the ease of brushing the teeth of a patient with an endotracheal tube may affect the frequency that this task is performed. Method: A descriptive study using pre- and post-study surveys was conducted in 3 ICUs. The pre-study survey was completed by 113 RNs; of those, 77 (68%) returned the post-study survey. Following the return of pre-study surveys, RNs used battery-operated toothbrushes with their intubated patients for 4 months before completing the post-study survey. Descriptive statistics were used to examine participants responses. The t-test was applied for group comparisons when appropriate. Results: Statistically significant increases in all questions regarding frequency, ease, effectiveness, and satisfaction were noted (alpha = 0.05). The study showed 67.6% of RNs brushed teeth of intubated patients at least once per shift > 60% of the time with a battery-operated toothbrush compared to 48.7% with manual toothbrushes. Battery-operated toothbrushes were rated effective to very effective by 60.8% of RNs compared to 11.5% for manual toothbrushes. The battery operated toothbrush was rated somewhat to much easier to use by 77% of RNs; 84.1% preferred battery-operated toothbrushes. Conclusions: RNs feel using a battery-operated toothbrush for oral care on intubated patients is easier, more effective and increases frequency of oral care than with a manual toothbrush. The hospital now provides battery-operated toothbrushes for all intubated patients.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:23:11Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:23:11Z-
dc.conference.date2009en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationLouisville, Kentucky, USAen_US
dc.description"Magnet: Inspiring Innovation, Achieving Outcomes" was the theme and "Explore the relationship among leadership, innovation, and nursing practice outcomes" was the goal of the 13th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 1-3 October, 2009 in Louisville, Kentucky, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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