2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182421
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
An Evidence-Based Plan of Care: Potential for Greater Stability in the Late Preterm Newborn
Author(s):
Buchko, Barbara
Author Details:
Barbara Buchko, MS, RN, York Hospital, York, Pennsylvania, USA, email: bbuchko@wellspan.org
Abstract:
Late preterm newborns (34 - 36 completed weeks gestation) have higher rates of post-discharge re-hospitalization and illness than full term infants. Late preterm newborns are often treated with the standard plan of care used for full term newborns although their risks are similar to premature newborns. The purpose of this project was to investigate whether implementation of an individualized plan of care and education (parent and nurse) would result in less late preterm instability. A group of mother-baby nurses conducted a literature review using the Johns Hopkins Nursing Evidence-Based Practice Model. Based on the literature, the translation strategies included changes to policies, development of a late preterm plan of care, and parent and nurse education. A comparative descriptive design was used to evaluate change in practice and patient outcomes before and after nurse education and implementation of the plan of care. Overall, 100 medical records were reviewed, 50 patients in each group (before and after). Chi-square analysis determined significant differences in nursing practice (p < 0.002) based on frequency of assessment of temperature, respiration, heart rate, and transcutaneous bilirubin. We compared patients with and without a documented plan of care for all variables. Only weight showed a significant difference. Weight loss was less in late preterm newborns with a plan of care (-71 g) than those without one (-148 g; p < 0.05). Overall implementation of the plan of care is at 58%. Increased use of the plan of care may improve additional outcomes for these babies. References: Adamkin, D.H. (2006). Feeding problems in the late preterm infant. Clinics in Perinatology, 33, 831-837. ; Bastek, J.A., Sammel, M.D., Pare, E. Srinivas, S.K., Posencheg, M.A. & Elovitz, M.A. (2008). Adverse neonatal outcomes: examining the risks between preterm, late preterm, and term infants. AJOG, 199, 367.e1-367.e8.; Engle, W. A., Tomashek, K.M., Wallman, C. and the Committee on Fetus and Newborn. (2007). Pediatrics, 120(6), 1390-1401.; Escobar, G.J., Clark, R.H. & Greene, J.D. (2006). Short-term outcomes of infants born at 35 and 36 weeks gestation: we need to ask more questions. Seminars in Perinatology, 30, 28-33.; Garg, M. & Devaskar, S.U. (2006). Glucose metabolism in the late preterm infant. Clinics in Perinatology, 33, 853-870.; Jorgensen, A. M. (2008). Late preterm infants: Clinical complications and risk. Nursing for Women's Health, 12(4), 317-331.; Keren, R., Luan, X., Friedman, S. Saddlemire,S., Cnaan, A. & Bhutani, V.K. (2008). A comparison of alternative risk-assessment strategies for predicting significant neonatal hyperbilirubinemia in term and near-term infants. Pediatric, 121(1), e170 - e179.; Medoff-Cooper, B., Bakewell-Sachs, S., Frazer Askin, D., Rosenberg, S. (2007). Late Preterm Infant Assessment Guide. AWHONN. ; Raju, T.N.K. (2006). Epidemiology of late preterm (near-term) births. Clinics in Perinatology, 33, 751-763.; Shaw, R.R.S. (2008). Late preterm birth: A new nursing issue. MCN, 33(5), 287-293.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Louisville, Kentucky, USA
Description:
"Magnet: Inspiring Innovation, Achieving Outcomes" was the theme and "Explore the relationship among leadership, innovation, and nursing practice outcomes" was the goal of the 13th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 1-3 October, 2009 in Louisville, Kentucky, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAn Evidence-Based Plan of Care: Potential for Greater Stability in the Late Preterm Newbornen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBuchko, Barbaraen_US
dc.author.detailsBarbara Buchko, MS, RN, York Hospital, York, Pennsylvania, USA, email: bbuchko@wellspan.orgen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182421-
dc.description.abstractLate preterm newborns (34 - 36 completed weeks gestation) have higher rates of post-discharge re-hospitalization and illness than full term infants. Late preterm newborns are often treated with the standard plan of care used for full term newborns although their risks are similar to premature newborns. The purpose of this project was to investigate whether implementation of an individualized plan of care and education (parent and nurse) would result in less late preterm instability. A group of mother-baby nurses conducted a literature review using the Johns Hopkins Nursing Evidence-Based Practice Model. Based on the literature, the translation strategies included changes to policies, development of a late preterm plan of care, and parent and nurse education. A comparative descriptive design was used to evaluate change in practice and patient outcomes before and after nurse education and implementation of the plan of care. Overall, 100 medical records were reviewed, 50 patients in each group (before and after). Chi-square analysis determined significant differences in nursing practice (p &lt; 0.002) based on frequency of assessment of temperature, respiration, heart rate, and transcutaneous bilirubin. We compared patients with and without a documented plan of care for all variables. Only weight showed a significant difference. Weight loss was less in late preterm newborns with a plan of care (-71 g) than those without one (-148 g; p &lt; 0.05). Overall implementation of the plan of care is at 58%. Increased use of the plan of care may improve additional outcomes for these babies. References: Adamkin, D.H. (2006). Feeding problems in the late preterm infant. Clinics in Perinatology, 33, 831-837. ; Bastek, J.A., Sammel, M.D., Pare, E. Srinivas, S.K., Posencheg, M.A. & Elovitz, M.A. (2008). Adverse neonatal outcomes: examining the risks between preterm, late preterm, and term infants. AJOG, 199, 367.e1-367.e8.; Engle, W. A., Tomashek, K.M., Wallman, C. and the Committee on Fetus and Newborn. (2007). Pediatrics, 120(6), 1390-1401.; Escobar, G.J., Clark, R.H. & Greene, J.D. (2006). Short-term outcomes of infants born at 35 and 36 weeks gestation: we need to ask more questions. Seminars in Perinatology, 30, 28-33.; Garg, M. & Devaskar, S.U. (2006). Glucose metabolism in the late preterm infant. Clinics in Perinatology, 33, 853-870.; Jorgensen, A. M. (2008). Late preterm infants: Clinical complications and risk. Nursing for Women's Health, 12(4), 317-331.; Keren, R., Luan, X., Friedman, S. Saddlemire,S., Cnaan, A. & Bhutani, V.K. (2008). A comparison of alternative risk-assessment strategies for predicting significant neonatal hyperbilirubinemia in term and near-term infants. Pediatric, 121(1), e170 - e179.; Medoff-Cooper, B., Bakewell-Sachs, S., Frazer Askin, D., Rosenberg, S. (2007). Late Preterm Infant Assessment Guide. AWHONN. ; Raju, T.N.K. (2006). Epidemiology of late preterm (near-term) births. Clinics in Perinatology, 33, 751-763.; Shaw, R.R.S. (2008). Late preterm birth: A new nursing issue. MCN, 33(5), 287-293.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:23:30Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:23:30Z-
dc.conference.date2009en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationLouisville, Kentucky, USAen_US
dc.description"Magnet: Inspiring Innovation, Achieving Outcomes" was the theme and "Explore the relationship among leadership, innovation, and nursing practice outcomes" was the goal of the 13th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 1-3 October, 2009 in Louisville, Kentucky, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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