2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182426
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Critical Care Track: An Innovative Transition Program for New Graduate Nurses
Author(s):
Bunke, Julie
Author Details:
Julie Bunke, RN, BSN, CCRN, Portland VA Medical Center, Portland, Oregon, USA, email: Julie.Bunke@va.gov
Abstract:
Purpose: To create an alternative grow your own recruitment stream for increasing preceptor capacity and Registered Nurse (RN) staff, and to compare innovative RN orientation strategies with traditional approaches. Background: A hospital combined medical-surgical (med/surg) Critical Care Unit (CCU) is experiencing increasing bed demand with subsequent expanding client census. As the CCU grows it must recruit, train and retain adequate numbers of nursing staff. Intensified recruitment efforts from FY07 to FY08 have increased CCU RN staffing by 32%, yet available preceptors has increased 6%, falling short of orientation demand. Hospitals face a competitive market for experienced critical care nurses. In light of abundant new graduate RNs interested in the CCU, yet limited preceptor capacity to train them, this new Critical Care Track (CCT) program functions as an innovative recruitment stream. Description: The new graduate CCT RNs work on a med/surg ward for 18 months with concomitant, gradually increasing exposure and specialized education in critical care nursing. After 18 months, the CCT nurses transfer to CCU, completing an orientation period approximating 50% (520 hours) of traditionally allotted hours (1040). A concurrent specialized preceptor training program is in development, based on a preceptor needs assessment. Outcomes: Data will be collected and contrasted between the CCT program and nurses oriented to CCU using traditional methods. Comparative data will include baseline nursing aptitude scores, orientation time, computerized orientation learning program test scores, nurse and preceptor satisfaction scores, retention rates at 1 and 2 year post-orientation intervals, and number of nurses achieving critical care certification.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Louisville, Kentucky, USA
Description:
"Magnet: Inspiring Innovation, Achieving Outcomes" was the theme and "Explore the relationship among leadership, innovation, and nursing practice outcomes" was the goal of the 13th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 1-3 October, 2009 in Louisville, Kentucky, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCritical Care Track: An Innovative Transition Program for New Graduate Nursesen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBunke, Julieen_US
dc.author.detailsJulie Bunke, RN, BSN, CCRN, Portland VA Medical Center, Portland, Oregon, USA, email: Julie.Bunke@va.goven_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182426-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: To create an alternative grow your own recruitment stream for increasing preceptor capacity and Registered Nurse (RN) staff, and to compare innovative RN orientation strategies with traditional approaches. Background: A hospital combined medical-surgical (med/surg) Critical Care Unit (CCU) is experiencing increasing bed demand with subsequent expanding client census. As the CCU grows it must recruit, train and retain adequate numbers of nursing staff. Intensified recruitment efforts from FY07 to FY08 have increased CCU RN staffing by 32%, yet available preceptors has increased 6%, falling short of orientation demand. Hospitals face a competitive market for experienced critical care nurses. In light of abundant new graduate RNs interested in the CCU, yet limited preceptor capacity to train them, this new Critical Care Track (CCT) program functions as an innovative recruitment stream. Description: The new graduate CCT RNs work on a med/surg ward for 18 months with concomitant, gradually increasing exposure and specialized education in critical care nursing. After 18 months, the CCT nurses transfer to CCU, completing an orientation period approximating 50% (520 hours) of traditionally allotted hours (1040). A concurrent specialized preceptor training program is in development, based on a preceptor needs assessment. Outcomes: Data will be collected and contrasted between the CCT program and nurses oriented to CCU using traditional methods. Comparative data will include baseline nursing aptitude scores, orientation time, computerized orientation learning program test scores, nurse and preceptor satisfaction scores, retention rates at 1 and 2 year post-orientation intervals, and number of nurses achieving critical care certification.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:23:42Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:23:42Z-
dc.conference.date2009en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationLouisville, Kentucky, USAen_US
dc.description"Magnet: Inspiring Innovation, Achieving Outcomes" was the theme and "Explore the relationship among leadership, innovation, and nursing practice outcomes" was the goal of the 13th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 1-3 October, 2009 in Louisville, Kentucky, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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