Nurses' Attitudes Toward Family Presence During Resuscitation: Does Nurses' Spirituality Have an Impact?

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182435
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Nurses' Attitudes Toward Family Presence During Resuscitation: Does Nurses' Spirituality Have an Impact?
Author(s):
Clark, Rebecca
Author Details:
Rebecca Clark, RN, PhD, Carilion Roanoke Memorial Hospital, Roanoke, Virginia, USA, email: becky@carilion.com
Abstract:
Despite documented benefits of family presence during resuscitation (FPDR) and focus on family and patient-centered care, allowing families to be present during their loved ones resuscitation remains a controversial practice. This study examines the relationship between attitudes of nurses toward FPDR and their spiritual perspective. This study contributes to information regarding nurses attitudes toward FPDR and previous experience with FPDR, educational preparation, professional certification, and population served. A one-time descriptive, correlational quantitative design was used in this study. Two surveys which examined attitudes toward FPDR and spiritual perspectives were distributed to a convenience sample of critical care and emergency room nurses (N = 133) at a level 1 trauma and regional tertiary care center. Nurses in the study had an overall positive attitude toward FPDR. Nurses with higher levels of education (p = .002), professional certifications (p = .004), and previous experience with FPDR (p = .024) had significantly more positive attitudes toward FPDR. No statistically significant differences in attitudes toward FPDR were found based on age of population served. No statistically significant relationship was detected between the overall attitude toward FPDR and nurses spiritual perspective. Findings from this study will facilitate an evidence-based approach to program development which supports FPDR. Future research should include expanding the population of nurses to include those working in other areas. The impact of nurses spirituality and nurses attitudes toward FPDR should also continue to be examined.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Louisville, Kentucky, USA
Description:
"Magnet: Inspiring Innovation, Achieving Outcomes" was the theme and "Explore the relationship among leadership, innovation, and nursing practice outcomes" was the goal of the 13th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 1-3 October, 2009 in Louisville, Kentucky, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNurses' Attitudes Toward Family Presence During Resuscitation: Does Nurses' Spirituality Have an Impact?en_GB
dc.contributor.authorClark, Rebeccaen_US
dc.author.detailsRebecca Clark, RN, PhD, Carilion Roanoke Memorial Hospital, Roanoke, Virginia, USA, email: becky@carilion.comen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182435-
dc.description.abstractDespite documented benefits of family presence during resuscitation (FPDR) and focus on family and patient-centered care, allowing families to be present during their loved ones resuscitation remains a controversial practice. This study examines the relationship between attitudes of nurses toward FPDR and their spiritual perspective. This study contributes to information regarding nurses attitudes toward FPDR and previous experience with FPDR, educational preparation, professional certification, and population served. A one-time descriptive, correlational quantitative design was used in this study. Two surveys which examined attitudes toward FPDR and spiritual perspectives were distributed to a convenience sample of critical care and emergency room nurses (N = 133) at a level 1 trauma and regional tertiary care center. Nurses in the study had an overall positive attitude toward FPDR. Nurses with higher levels of education (p = .002), professional certifications (p = .004), and previous experience with FPDR (p = .024) had significantly more positive attitudes toward FPDR. No statistically significant differences in attitudes toward FPDR were found based on age of population served. No statistically significant relationship was detected between the overall attitude toward FPDR and nurses spiritual perspective. Findings from this study will facilitate an evidence-based approach to program development which supports FPDR. Future research should include expanding the population of nurses to include those working in other areas. The impact of nurses spirituality and nurses attitudes toward FPDR should also continue to be examined.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:24:05Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:24:05Z-
dc.conference.date2009en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationLouisville, Kentucky, USAen_US
dc.description"Magnet: Inspiring Innovation, Achieving Outcomes" was the theme and "Explore the relationship among leadership, innovation, and nursing practice outcomes" was the goal of the 13th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 1-3 October, 2009 in Louisville, Kentucky, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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