2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182440
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Exploring Nurses' Attitudes on the Use of Rapid Response Teams
Author(s):
Coleman, Berni
Author Details:
Berni Coleman, PhD, ACNP, Cedars Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, California, USA, email: bernice.coleman@cshs.org
Abstract:
Background As part of the Institute for Healthcare Initiative (IHI) nationwide campaign to save 100,000 lives, hospitals have been encouraged to adopt a Rapid Response Teams (RRT) innovation. Implementing a nurse driven RRT program requires a hospital cultural change from Code Blue response to Code Blue prevention. We visited an experienced team in Australia and, while implementing RRT, undertook the validation of a tool to assess nurses attitudes towards its use. Methods Upon approval from our Institutional Review Board (IRB), 315 nurses (54% day shift and 44% night shift) completed an anonymous; twenty item Likert-scale survey. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, factor analysis, scale reliability analysis and ANOVA. Results Factor analysis revealed four independent factors that we interpreted as Critical Thinking (5 items); Patient Management (5 items), Perceived Value (7 items), and Ethics Management (3 items). Responses were normally distributed and exhibited a good range. Chronbach alpha statistics for subscales ranged from a low of 0.669 for the Ethics subscale to a high of 0.764 (alpha =0.826 for the full 20-item scale). ANOVA indicated that more experienced nurses and nurses who used patient criteria (vs. intuition) to initiate an RRT call had more positive attitudes towards RRT. Attitudes were unrelated to direct experience with RRT calls. Conclusions The RRT attitude scale appears to have adequate psychometric properties to measure nurses attitudes towards using RRT. Findings related to experience and decisions to use RRT can inform diffusion and training strategies.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Louisville, Kentucky, USA
Description:
"Magnet: Inspiring Innovation, Achieving Outcomes" was the theme and "Explore the relationship among leadership, innovation, and nursing practice outcomes" was the goal of the 13th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 1-3 October, 2009 in Louisville, Kentucky, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleExploring Nurses' Attitudes on the Use of Rapid Response Teamsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorColeman, Bernien_US
dc.author.detailsBerni Coleman, PhD, ACNP, Cedars Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, California, USA, email: bernice.coleman@cshs.orgen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182440-
dc.description.abstractBackground As part of the Institute for Healthcare Initiative (IHI) nationwide campaign to save 100,000 lives, hospitals have been encouraged to adopt a Rapid Response Teams (RRT) innovation. Implementing a nurse driven RRT program requires a hospital cultural change from Code Blue response to Code Blue prevention. We visited an experienced team in Australia and, while implementing RRT, undertook the validation of a tool to assess nurses attitudes towards its use. Methods Upon approval from our Institutional Review Board (IRB), 315 nurses (54% day shift and 44% night shift) completed an anonymous; twenty item Likert-scale survey. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, factor analysis, scale reliability analysis and ANOVA. Results Factor analysis revealed four independent factors that we interpreted as Critical Thinking (5 items); Patient Management (5 items), Perceived Value (7 items), and Ethics Management (3 items). Responses were normally distributed and exhibited a good range. Chronbach alpha statistics for subscales ranged from a low of 0.669 for the Ethics subscale to a high of 0.764 (alpha =0.826 for the full 20-item scale). ANOVA indicated that more experienced nurses and nurses who used patient criteria (vs. intuition) to initiate an RRT call had more positive attitudes towards RRT. Attitudes were unrelated to direct experience with RRT calls. Conclusions The RRT attitude scale appears to have adequate psychometric properties to measure nurses attitudes towards using RRT. Findings related to experience and decisions to use RRT can inform diffusion and training strategies.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:24:19Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:24:19Z-
dc.conference.date2009en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationLouisville, Kentucky, USAen_US
dc.description"Magnet: Inspiring Innovation, Achieving Outcomes" was the theme and "Explore the relationship among leadership, innovation, and nursing practice outcomes" was the goal of the 13th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 1-3 October, 2009 in Louisville, Kentucky, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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