2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182441
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Protocols, Protocols - Which One to Use?
Author(s):
Collins, Michelle
Author Details:
Michelle Collins, BSN, RN, Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center, Winston-Salem, North Carolina, USA, email: micollin@wfubmc.edu
Abstract:
The Joint Commission established the core measures to help hospitals achieve optimal outcomes for their patients. To perform well in the core measures arena, various quality improvement initiatives were undertaken. One such measure was to identify the most common portal of entry into the hospital for those special patient populations with pneumonia, sepsis, chest pain and stroke. The common site of entry for the majority of these cases was the emergency department. Once the patient was in the hospital, it was essential that we ensure rapid disease identification and that interventions were performed in a timely manner. To achieve this goal, various protocols were put into place. Should a patient enter triage with chest pain, they were immediately placed into the chest pain protocol; the same could be said for those exhibiting signs of stroke. For patients entering the emergency department with complaints of fever, coughing, body aches, tachycardia, etc; the picture was less clear. Should they be placed in the pneumonia protocol or the sepsis protocol? There were similar inclusion criteria for both. Staff nurses in the emergency department recognized this as a limiting factor in complying with the protocols. Staff nurses teamed with ED Management, ED Educator, Quality Resource Nurses, pharmacy and various physician champions to create a joint protocol for pneumonia and sepsis. This protocol incorporates all the desired interventions into a single order set. The order set allows the bedside nurse to rapidly assess for inclusion criteria and to begin interventions in a timely manner. References: Severe Sepsis Campaign: International guidelines for management of severe sepsis and septic shock: 2008, Intensive Care Med, October 2007.; Official Statement of the American Thoracic Society and the Infectious Disease Society of America, Guidelines on the Management of Community Acquired Pneumonia in Adults, Clinical Infectious Diseases 2007;27-72.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Louisville, Kentucky, USA
Description:
"Magnet: Inspiring Innovation, Achieving Outcomes" was the theme and "Explore the relationship among leadership, innovation, and nursing practice outcomes" was the goal of the 13th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 1-3 October, 2009 in Louisville, Kentucky, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleProtocols, Protocols - Which One to Use?en_GB
dc.contributor.authorCollins, Michelleen_US
dc.author.detailsMichelle Collins, BSN, RN, Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center, Winston-Salem, North Carolina, USA, email: micollin@wfubmc.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182441-
dc.description.abstractThe Joint Commission established the core measures to help hospitals achieve optimal outcomes for their patients. To perform well in the core measures arena, various quality improvement initiatives were undertaken. One such measure was to identify the most common portal of entry into the hospital for those special patient populations with pneumonia, sepsis, chest pain and stroke. The common site of entry for the majority of these cases was the emergency department. Once the patient was in the hospital, it was essential that we ensure rapid disease identification and that interventions were performed in a timely manner. To achieve this goal, various protocols were put into place. Should a patient enter triage with chest pain, they were immediately placed into the chest pain protocol; the same could be said for those exhibiting signs of stroke. For patients entering the emergency department with complaints of fever, coughing, body aches, tachycardia, etc; the picture was less clear. Should they be placed in the pneumonia protocol or the sepsis protocol? There were similar inclusion criteria for both. Staff nurses in the emergency department recognized this as a limiting factor in complying with the protocols. Staff nurses teamed with ED Management, ED Educator, Quality Resource Nurses, pharmacy and various physician champions to create a joint protocol for pneumonia and sepsis. This protocol incorporates all the desired interventions into a single order set. The order set allows the bedside nurse to rapidly assess for inclusion criteria and to begin interventions in a timely manner. References: Severe Sepsis Campaign: International guidelines for management of severe sepsis and septic shock: 2008, Intensive Care Med, October 2007.; Official Statement of the American Thoracic Society and the Infectious Disease Society of America, Guidelines on the Management of Community Acquired Pneumonia in Adults, Clinical Infectious Diseases 2007;27-72.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:24:21Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:24:21Z-
dc.conference.date2009en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationLouisville, Kentucky, USAen_US
dc.description"Magnet: Inspiring Innovation, Achieving Outcomes" was the theme and "Explore the relationship among leadership, innovation, and nursing practice outcomes" was the goal of the 13th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 1-3 October, 2009 in Louisville, Kentucky, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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