2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182446
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Nursing University Concept for Nursing Orientation
Author(s):
Culley, Tom
Author Details:
Tom Culley, RN, BSN, MBA, The Western Pennsylvania Hospital, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA, email: tculley@wpahs.org
Abstract:
Faced with the struggle of preparing nurses for their work environment, agency requirements, and organizational culture Nursing University has been created with the intention to provide a structured opportunity for new nurses to be introduced to concepts that are supportive of the goals for the nursing division. Nursing University is an extension of nursing orientation where students attend eight sessions over two "semesters", each session includes a lecture followed by practice in the simulation center and/or handling equipment that is used throughout the hospital. In the first semester students learn NSG 101: IV Therapy Essentials and Central Line Care, NSG 201: Blue Alerts, NSG 301: Aspects of Documentation, and NSG 401: Excellent Service. In the second semester students continue to NSG 501: Essentials of Pain Management, NSG 601 National Patient Safety Goals, NSG 701: Lab Interpretation and Blood Sampling, and NSG 801: Unit Specific Competency Review. Students are taught by "professors" who are among the experts in the hospital and can earn a total of 13.5 Continuing Education Credits for completion of all nursing university programs. Other nurses may attend university for remediation or to increase knowledge. The program is a great introduction for nursing staff and offers flexibility for managers as well. In addition, we are measuring the possibility that a program such as Nursing University can decrease lab errors, documentation errors, and med errors, while increasing retention on nursing units. References: Herdrich, B., Lindsay, A. (2006) Nurse Residency Programs: Redesigning the Transition Into Practice. Journal For Nurses In Staff Development 22:2 55-62.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Louisville, Kentucky, USA
Description:
"Magnet: Inspiring Innovation, Achieving Outcomes" was the theme and "Explore the relationship among leadership, innovation, and nursing practice outcomes" was the goal of the 13th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 1-3 October, 2009 in Louisville, Kentucky, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNursing University Concept for Nursing Orientationen_GB
dc.contributor.authorCulley, Tomen_US
dc.author.detailsTom Culley, RN, BSN, MBA, The Western Pennsylvania Hospital, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA, email: tculley@wpahs.orgen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182446-
dc.description.abstractFaced with the struggle of preparing nurses for their work environment, agency requirements, and organizational culture Nursing University has been created with the intention to provide a structured opportunity for new nurses to be introduced to concepts that are supportive of the goals for the nursing division. Nursing University is an extension of nursing orientation where students attend eight sessions over two "semesters", each session includes a lecture followed by practice in the simulation center and/or handling equipment that is used throughout the hospital. In the first semester students learn NSG 101: IV Therapy Essentials and Central Line Care, NSG 201: Blue Alerts, NSG 301: Aspects of Documentation, and NSG 401: Excellent Service. In the second semester students continue to NSG 501: Essentials of Pain Management, NSG 601 National Patient Safety Goals, NSG 701: Lab Interpretation and Blood Sampling, and NSG 801: Unit Specific Competency Review. Students are taught by "professors" who are among the experts in the hospital and can earn a total of 13.5 Continuing Education Credits for completion of all nursing university programs. Other nurses may attend university for remediation or to increase knowledge. The program is a great introduction for nursing staff and offers flexibility for managers as well. In addition, we are measuring the possibility that a program such as Nursing University can decrease lab errors, documentation errors, and med errors, while increasing retention on nursing units. References: Herdrich, B., Lindsay, A. (2006) Nurse Residency Programs: Redesigning the Transition Into Practice. Journal For Nurses In Staff Development 22:2 55-62.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:24:35Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:24:35Z-
dc.conference.date2009en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationLouisville, Kentucky, USAen_US
dc.description"Magnet: Inspiring Innovation, Achieving Outcomes" was the theme and "Explore the relationship among leadership, innovation, and nursing practice outcomes" was the goal of the 13th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 1-3 October, 2009 in Louisville, Kentucky, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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