Ready, Set, Grow: Interactive Strategies for Advancing Graduate Nurse Critical Thinking - Presentation 2

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182460
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Ready, Set, Grow: Interactive Strategies for Advancing Graduate Nurse Critical Thinking - Presentation 2
Author(s):
DelMonte, JoAnn
Author Details:
JoAnn DelMonte, RN, MS, University of Colorado Hospital, Aurora, Colorado, USA, email: JoAnn.DelMonte@uch.edu
Abstract:
Critical thinking is a challenging concept to develop in graduate nurses. While technical skills can be instructed in a brief time frame, critical thinking is comprised of multiple dimensions that must be conceptually integrated for the graduate nurse to use in differentiating assessment findings and selecting appropriate interventions. While Benner (1984) notes that graduate nurses enter the profession as advanced beginners, a recent study (Roberts, Lockhart, Sportsman, 2009) reported that many graduate nurses are still functioning at the novice rather than advanced beginner level. This poses a challenge for hospitals who desire to reduce the time required for safe transition to practice but find that complexity and technology require more rather than less time. Interactive exercises to enhance critical thinking are essential strategies for the graduate to store in their tool box as they transition to proficient nurses. Using interactive techniques is noted as a sound approach to improve engagement and stimulate critical thinking (Ridley, 2007). Interactive strategies to engage graduate nurses in advancing critical thinking in their transition year will be discussed and demonstrated. Video will be used to show how to use these techniques. Clinical narratives, small focus group seminars, and graduate nurses voices will be heard to provide insight into methods and the impact they may have on their transition into practice. Data will be presented to report how these strategies influenced role functioning post transition to practice, demonstrating how critical thinking helps to move practice from novice toward proficient clinical nurses.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Louisville, Kentucky, USA
Description:
"Magnet: Inspiring Innovation, Achieving Outcomes" was the theme and "Explore the relationship among leadership, innovation, and nursing practice outcomes" was the goal of the 13th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 1-3 October, 2009 in Louisville, Kentucky, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleReady, Set, Grow: Interactive Strategies for Advancing Graduate Nurse Critical Thinking - Presentation 2en_GB
dc.contributor.authorDelMonte, JoAnnen_US
dc.author.detailsJoAnn DelMonte, RN, MS, University of Colorado Hospital, Aurora, Colorado, USA, email: JoAnn.DelMonte@uch.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182460-
dc.description.abstractCritical thinking is a challenging concept to develop in graduate nurses. While technical skills can be instructed in a brief time frame, critical thinking is comprised of multiple dimensions that must be conceptually integrated for the graduate nurse to use in differentiating assessment findings and selecting appropriate interventions. While Benner (1984) notes that graduate nurses enter the profession as advanced beginners, a recent study (Roberts, Lockhart, Sportsman, 2009) reported that many graduate nurses are still functioning at the novice rather than advanced beginner level. This poses a challenge for hospitals who desire to reduce the time required for safe transition to practice but find that complexity and technology require more rather than less time. Interactive exercises to enhance critical thinking are essential strategies for the graduate to store in their tool box as they transition to proficient nurses. Using interactive techniques is noted as a sound approach to improve engagement and stimulate critical thinking (Ridley, 2007). Interactive strategies to engage graduate nurses in advancing critical thinking in their transition year will be discussed and demonstrated. Video will be used to show how to use these techniques. Clinical narratives, small focus group seminars, and graduate nurses voices will be heard to provide insight into methods and the impact they may have on their transition into practice. Data will be presented to report how these strategies influenced role functioning post transition to practice, demonstrating how critical thinking helps to move practice from novice toward proficient clinical nurses.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:25:15Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:25:15Z-
dc.conference.date2009en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationLouisville, Kentucky, USAen_US
dc.description"Magnet: Inspiring Innovation, Achieving Outcomes" was the theme and "Explore the relationship among leadership, innovation, and nursing practice outcomes" was the goal of the 13th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 1-3 October, 2009 in Louisville, Kentucky, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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