2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182461
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Stop Them at the Door: Should Pressure Ulcer Prevention Be Initiated in the Emergency Department?
Author(s):
Denby, Abby
Author Details:
Abby Denby, BSN, RN, CWCN, Martha Jefferson Hospital, Charlottesville, Virginia, USA, email: abby.denby@mjh.org
Abstract:
Purpose: The purpose of this descriptive study was to determine the feasibility of implementing a Pressure Ulcer Prevention Protocol in the Emergency Department (ED). Background and Significance: Studies have shown that prevention protocols are effective in reducing the incidence of hospital acquired pressure ulcers (Beckrich & Aronovitch, 1999). A Pressure Ulcer Prevention Protocol was developed and implemented on all nursing units in a Magnet designated community hospital, with the exception of the Emergency Department (ED). Given the complex nature of the ED and the multitude of interactions that patients receive; this investigator is exploring the feasibility of implementing the Pressure Ulcer Prevention Protocol in the ED. Implementing this in the emergency department will help recognize patients at high risk for pressure ulcers, and nursing interventions can be implemented earlier. Methodology: Using data abstraction, a descriptive analysis was conducted to examine the relationship between ED length of stay (LOS) and hospital acquired pressure ulcers for those patients who were directly admitted to the hospital from the ED. Results: During 2006, 32,664 patients sought medical attention through the ED. Seventy-five percent of the total patient population admitted was admitted from the ED. One hundred twenty-five of those patients developed hospital acquired pressure ulcers, of which, 99.2% had an ED LOS greater than two hours prior to hospital admission. The insights gained by this study demonstrate early nursing interventions are needed to prevent hospital acquired pressure ulcers. Reference: Beckrich, K., and Aronovitch, S., Hospital acquired pressure ulcers: A comparison.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Louisville, Kentucky, USA
Description:
"Magnet: Inspiring Innovation, Achieving Outcomes" was the theme and "Explore the relationship among leadership, innovation, and nursing practice outcomes" was the goal of the 13th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 1-3 October, 2009 in Louisville, Kentucky, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleStop Them at the Door: Should Pressure Ulcer Prevention Be Initiated in the Emergency Department?en_GB
dc.contributor.authorDenby, Abbyen_US
dc.author.detailsAbby Denby, BSN, RN, CWCN, Martha Jefferson Hospital, Charlottesville, Virginia, USA, email: abby.denby@mjh.orgen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182461-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The purpose of this descriptive study was to determine the feasibility of implementing a Pressure Ulcer Prevention Protocol in the Emergency Department (ED). Background and Significance: Studies have shown that prevention protocols are effective in reducing the incidence of hospital acquired pressure ulcers (Beckrich & Aronovitch, 1999). A Pressure Ulcer Prevention Protocol was developed and implemented on all nursing units in a Magnet designated community hospital, with the exception of the Emergency Department (ED). Given the complex nature of the ED and the multitude of interactions that patients receive; this investigator is exploring the feasibility of implementing the Pressure Ulcer Prevention Protocol in the ED. Implementing this in the emergency department will help recognize patients at high risk for pressure ulcers, and nursing interventions can be implemented earlier. Methodology: Using data abstraction, a descriptive analysis was conducted to examine the relationship between ED length of stay (LOS) and hospital acquired pressure ulcers for those patients who were directly admitted to the hospital from the ED. Results: During 2006, 32,664 patients sought medical attention through the ED. Seventy-five percent of the total patient population admitted was admitted from the ED. One hundred twenty-five of those patients developed hospital acquired pressure ulcers, of which, 99.2% had an ED LOS greater than two hours prior to hospital admission. The insights gained by this study demonstrate early nursing interventions are needed to prevent hospital acquired pressure ulcers. Reference: Beckrich, K., and Aronovitch, S., Hospital acquired pressure ulcers: A comparison.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:25:17Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:25:17Z-
dc.conference.date2009en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationLouisville, Kentucky, USAen_US
dc.description"Magnet: Inspiring Innovation, Achieving Outcomes" was the theme and "Explore the relationship among leadership, innovation, and nursing practice outcomes" was the goal of the 13th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 1-3 October, 2009 in Louisville, Kentucky, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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