2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182463
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Red Means Sleep: Improving Sleep Through Nursing Research
Author(s):
Dennison, Pamela
Author Details:
Pamela Dennison, MSN, RN, ACNS-BC, CNL, University of Virginia Health System, Charlottesville, Virginia, USA, email: PDD8H@hscmail.mcc.virginia.edu
Abstract:
Poor sleep is often reported by patients with psychiatric disorders. Our psychiatry units require 15 minute safety checks for each patient throughout the night. These checks are conducted using incandescent white light. Patients frequently report sleep disturbance due to the bright light. Red filter light has been shown to have no effect on circadian rhythms. We investigated the use of a red filtered flashlight for night checks. Materials included red filtered flashlights, a patient checklist noting asleep or awake, and a brief survey adapted from the Shut-I and National Sleep Foundation questionnaires. Quantity of sleep was measured using a convenience sample of patients on the inpatient psychiatric units during a 2-month period. One unit served as control group; the other experimental. Total possible hours of sleep were compared with actual hours slept. Fifty-seven patients completed at least one interview. Both quantity and quality of sleep improved with the use of the red filtered light, with some measures reaching statistical significance. Using regression analysis and adjusting for differences in units, when acutal and possible hours of sleep were compared, there was a 3.22% increase in hours slept when the red filtered flashlight was used. This finding was statistically significant. Our results indicate the use of red filtered light improved both quantity and quality of sleep. Nursing research led to a practice change, improved assessment of sleep, patient satisfaction and attention to correction of environmental factors affecting sleep. Nursing staff pride, confidence and teamwork were enhanced through this interdisciplinary clinical nursing research project.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Louisville, Kentucky, USA
Description:
"Magnet: Inspiring Innovation, Achieving Outcomes" was the theme and "Explore the relationship among leadership, innovation, and nursing practice outcomes" was the goal of the 13th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 1-3 October, 2009 in Louisville, Kentucky, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleRed Means Sleep: Improving Sleep Through Nursing Researchen_GB
dc.contributor.authorDennison, Pamelaen_US
dc.author.detailsPamela Dennison, MSN, RN, ACNS-BC, CNL, University of Virginia Health System, Charlottesville, Virginia, USA, email: PDD8H@hscmail.mcc.virginia.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182463-
dc.description.abstractPoor sleep is often reported by patients with psychiatric disorders. Our psychiatry units require 15 minute safety checks for each patient throughout the night. These checks are conducted using incandescent white light. Patients frequently report sleep disturbance due to the bright light. Red filter light has been shown to have no effect on circadian rhythms. We investigated the use of a red filtered flashlight for night checks. Materials included red filtered flashlights, a patient checklist noting asleep or awake, and a brief survey adapted from the Shut-I and National Sleep Foundation questionnaires. Quantity of sleep was measured using a convenience sample of patients on the inpatient psychiatric units during a 2-month period. One unit served as control group; the other experimental. Total possible hours of sleep were compared with actual hours slept. Fifty-seven patients completed at least one interview. Both quantity and quality of sleep improved with the use of the red filtered light, with some measures reaching statistical significance. Using regression analysis and adjusting for differences in units, when acutal and possible hours of sleep were compared, there was a 3.22% increase in hours slept when the red filtered flashlight was used. This finding was statistically significant. Our results indicate the use of red filtered light improved both quantity and quality of sleep. Nursing research led to a practice change, improved assessment of sleep, patient satisfaction and attention to correction of environmental factors affecting sleep. Nursing staff pride, confidence and teamwork were enhanced through this interdisciplinary clinical nursing research project.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:25:22Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:25:22Z-
dc.conference.date2009en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationLouisville, Kentucky, USAen_US
dc.description"Magnet: Inspiring Innovation, Achieving Outcomes" was the theme and "Explore the relationship among leadership, innovation, and nursing practice outcomes" was the goal of the 13th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 1-3 October, 2009 in Louisville, Kentucky, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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