2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182476
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Nurse-Driven Collaboration to Improve Outcomes in Delirium
Author(s):
Eden, Brenda
Author Details:
Brenda Eden, MS, APN, ACNS-BC, Memorial Medical Center, Springfield, Illinois, USA, email: eden.brenda@mhsil.com
Abstract:
Within the hospital setting delirium contributes to significant morbidity and mortality in as much as 28% to 80% of patients admitted. (1) Early recognition and interventions improve outcomes, yet nurses and physicians fail to detect the symptoms. Non-detection rates are as high as 66%. (2) In a central Midwest community an academic medical center and college of medicine developed a 3 to 5 year initiative to implement evidence-based assessment and treatment for patients with delirium. A steering committee was formed with medical staff, nursing leadership, and staff nurses to develop and lead a plan for practice changes. The goals for the initiative include (1) improve recognition of delirium by implementing a validated tool for daily use at the bedside, (2) reduce incidence of delirium through education of nurses and physicians, and the development of assessment and treatment protocols, and (3) reduce the impact on the patients and community through management strategies and algorithms. Baseline data were obtained through an IRB approved research study conducted by staff nurses to determine incidence and prevalence and barriers to identification of delirium. Staff nurses obtained three grants to fund both the study and the education for nurses and physicians. Implementation throughout the hospital is accomplished through the TCAB (Transforming Care at the Bedside) approach. Each phase of the initiative has been presented to medical staff and nursing practice groups to promote ongoing support for the practice changes. Improved outcomes and practices changes are sustained through collaboration and community support. References: 1. Balas, Deutschman, Sullivan-Marx, Strumpf, Alston, & Richmond, 2007; Ely, Inouye et al., 2001; Ely, Margolis, 2001; Inouye, 2006. ; 2. Inouye, 1994; McLafferty, 2007.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Louisville, Kentucky, USA
Description:
"Magnet: Inspiring Innovation, Achieving Outcomes" was the theme and "Explore the relationship among leadership, innovation, and nursing practice outcomes" was the goal of the 13th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 1-3 October, 2009 in Louisville, Kentucky, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNurse-Driven Collaboration to Improve Outcomes in Deliriumen_GB
dc.contributor.authorEden, Brendaen_US
dc.author.detailsBrenda Eden, MS, APN, ACNS-BC, Memorial Medical Center, Springfield, Illinois, USA, email: eden.brenda@mhsil.comen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182476-
dc.description.abstractWithin the hospital setting delirium contributes to significant morbidity and mortality in as much as 28% to 80% of patients admitted. (1) Early recognition and interventions improve outcomes, yet nurses and physicians fail to detect the symptoms. Non-detection rates are as high as 66%. (2) In a central Midwest community an academic medical center and college of medicine developed a 3 to 5 year initiative to implement evidence-based assessment and treatment for patients with delirium. A steering committee was formed with medical staff, nursing leadership, and staff nurses to develop and lead a plan for practice changes. The goals for the initiative include (1) improve recognition of delirium by implementing a validated tool for daily use at the bedside, (2) reduce incidence of delirium through education of nurses and physicians, and the development of assessment and treatment protocols, and (3) reduce the impact on the patients and community through management strategies and algorithms. Baseline data were obtained through an IRB approved research study conducted by staff nurses to determine incidence and prevalence and barriers to identification of delirium. Staff nurses obtained three grants to fund both the study and the education for nurses and physicians. Implementation throughout the hospital is accomplished through the TCAB (Transforming Care at the Bedside) approach. Each phase of the initiative has been presented to medical staff and nursing practice groups to promote ongoing support for the practice changes. Improved outcomes and practices changes are sustained through collaboration and community support. References: 1. Balas, Deutschman, Sullivan-Marx, Strumpf, Alston, & Richmond, 2007; Ely, Inouye et al., 2001; Ely, Margolis, 2001; Inouye, 2006. ; 2. Inouye, 1994; McLafferty, 2007.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:25:56Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:25:56Z-
dc.conference.date2009en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationLouisville, Kentucky, USAen_US
dc.description"Magnet: Inspiring Innovation, Achieving Outcomes" was the theme and "Explore the relationship among leadership, innovation, and nursing practice outcomes" was the goal of the 13th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 1-3 October, 2009 in Louisville, Kentucky, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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