2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182488
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Emergency Medical Services Blood Specimen Quality Versus Emergency Department Staff
Author(s):
Gabel Speroni, Karen
Author Details:
Karen Gabel Speroni, PhD, RN, Inova Loudoun Hospital, Leesburg, VA, USA, email: kgabelsperoni@smartneighborhood.net
Abstract:
Purpose: The practice of accepting blood specimens drawn by Emergency Medical Services (EMS) varies between Emergency Departments (ED). Blood specimens obtained by EMS in the field and ED staff were compared for rate of specimen redraw, ED throughout time, and blood exposures incidences. Design: This is a prospective, observational data collection study in 400 patients: Group 1: Patients arriving via EMS with blood specimens drawn in the field (N= 200). Group 2: Patients arriving via EMS without blood specimens but requiring them on arrival to ED (N=200). Subjects: ED patients 18 years of age or older arriving via EMS requiring intravenous (IV) access and blood sampling. Results: Data from the 400 blood specimens were compared between the EMS group and the ED group. The proportion of specimen redraw was lower for the EMS group (9.5%) than for the ED group (11.5%). The majority of redraws in the EMS group were due to insufficient specimen quantity (52.6%; ED=8.7%) (p< 0.05). The majority of redraws in the ED group were due to hemolysis (ED=52.2%; EMS =31.6%). Median ED throughout time was 17 minutes shorter for the EMS group (163 minutes) than for the ED group (180 minutes). There were no blood exposures in either group. Recommendation: Based on a lack of a statistically significant difference in redraw rates between the groups, a decreased ED patient throughput time, and no undue blood exposure incidences, pre-hospital phlebotomy by EMS in the field and subsequent ED acceptance of samples is a standard of practice that can be implemented.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Louisville, Kentucky, USA
Description:
"Magnet: Inspiring Innovation, Achieving Outcomes" was the theme and "Explore the relationship among leadership, innovation, and nursing practice outcomes" was the goal of the 13th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 1-3 October, 2009 in Louisville, Kentucky, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEmergency Medical Services Blood Specimen Quality Versus Emergency Department Staffen_GB
dc.contributor.authorGabel Speroni, Karenen_US
dc.author.detailsKaren Gabel Speroni, PhD, RN, Inova Loudoun Hospital, Leesburg, VA, USA, email: kgabelsperoni@smartneighborhood.neten_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182488-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The practice of accepting blood specimens drawn by Emergency Medical Services (EMS) varies between Emergency Departments (ED). Blood specimens obtained by EMS in the field and ED staff were compared for rate of specimen redraw, ED throughout time, and blood exposures incidences. Design: This is a prospective, observational data collection study in 400 patients: Group 1: Patients arriving via EMS with blood specimens drawn in the field (N= 200). Group 2: Patients arriving via EMS without blood specimens but requiring them on arrival to ED (N=200). Subjects: ED patients 18 years of age or older arriving via EMS requiring intravenous (IV) access and blood sampling. Results: Data from the 400 blood specimens were compared between the EMS group and the ED group. The proportion of specimen redraw was lower for the EMS group (9.5%) than for the ED group (11.5%). The majority of redraws in the EMS group were due to insufficient specimen quantity (52.6%; ED=8.7%) (p&lt; 0.05). The majority of redraws in the ED group were due to hemolysis (ED=52.2%; EMS =31.6%). Median ED throughout time was 17 minutes shorter for the EMS group (163 minutes) than for the ED group (180 minutes). There were no blood exposures in either group. Recommendation: Based on a lack of a statistically significant difference in redraw rates between the groups, a decreased ED patient throughput time, and no undue blood exposure incidences, pre-hospital phlebotomy by EMS in the field and subsequent ED acceptance of samples is a standard of practice that can be implemented.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:26:27Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:26:27Z-
dc.conference.date2009en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationLouisville, Kentucky, USAen_US
dc.description"Magnet: Inspiring Innovation, Achieving Outcomes" was the theme and "Explore the relationship among leadership, innovation, and nursing practice outcomes" was the goal of the 13th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 1-3 October, 2009 in Louisville, Kentucky, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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