2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182492
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
No Bones About It, the Pediatric Emergency Department Has Gone to the Dogs
Author(s):
Goeddeke, Vicky
Author Details:
Vicky Goeddeke, RN, BSN, MS, CEN, Northwest Community Hospital, Chicago, Illinois, USA, email: vgoeddek@nch.org
Abstract:
Even Florence Nightingale recognized the impact of animals on health when she wrote "a small pet animal is often an excellent companion for the sick". Research confirms animal interaction can impact both physical and psychological aspects of the patients status. Typically offered to in-patient areas where the environment is stable, animal assisted therapy has been offered in what would be considered alternative settings. However, the how-to manual of standards for these areas is still being written. This Magnet recognized community hospital established an animal assisted therapy program in 2007. Soon after the benefits of the program were realized, we began investigation into the possibility of expanding the animal visits to the Pediatric Emergency Department. Considerations needed to include how to determine patients' eligibility for visits, the challenges of the physical environment, and the ability to stop or cancel visits if indicated by critical patient issues within the department. Program Guidelines: 1) Scheduled times for animal visits 2) Patients screened for eligibility 3) Nurse driven, parental consent obtained 4) Patient/family prepared for visit, hand-out overview of program guidelines 5) Hygiene considerations after animal interactions. Outcomes: 1) Feedback reflects high patient/family satisfaction with program 2) Increased frequency of scheduled visits due to positive feedback 3) Positive feedback from animal handlers assigned to area 4) Increased staff satisfaction. Future: 1) Additional expansion of scheduled visit times 2) Expand program to Main Emergency Department 3) Consider formal research project 4) Consider animal visits with staff focus. References: DiSalvo, Heidi MPH a; Haiduven, Donna BSN, MSN, PhD a,b; Johnson, Nancy BSN, MSN b; Reyes, Valentine V. BSN b; Hench, Carmen P. BSN b; Shaw, Rosemary OT b; Stevens, David A. MD b Who let the dogs out? Infection control did: Utility of dogs in health care settings and infection control aspects. [Article.]AJIC: American Journal of Infection Control. 34(5):301-307, June 2006.; Hooker, Shirley D. RN, BSN; Holbrook Freeman, Linda RN, DNS; Stewart, Pamela RN, BSN Pet Therapy Research: A Historical Review. [Article.]Holistic Nursing Practice. 17(1):17-23, October 2002.; Kathie M. RN, MN, CCRN *; Gawlinski, Anna RN, DNSc, CS-ACNP + Animal-Assisted Therapy: The Human-Animal Bond. [Miscellaneous Article.]AACN Clinical Issues: Advanced Practice in Acute & Critical Care. Complementary and Alternative Therapies. 11(1):139-149, February 2000.; Stanley-Hermanns, Melinda MSN, RN,BC; Miller, Julie BSN, RN, CCRN Animal-Assisted Therapy: Domestic animals aren't merely pets. To some, they can be healers. [Article.]AJN, American Journal of Nursing. 102(10):69-76, October 2002.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Louisville, Kentucky, USA
Description:
"Magnet: Inspiring Innovation, Achieving Outcomes" was the theme and "Explore the relationship among leadership, innovation, and nursing practice outcomes" was the goal of the 13th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 1-3 October, 2009 in Louisville, Kentucky, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNo Bones About It, the Pediatric Emergency Department Has Gone to the Dogsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorGoeddeke, Vickyen_US
dc.author.detailsVicky Goeddeke, RN, BSN, MS, CEN, Northwest Community Hospital, Chicago, Illinois, USA, email: vgoeddek@nch.orgen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182492-
dc.description.abstractEven Florence Nightingale recognized the impact of animals on health when she wrote "a small pet animal is often an excellent companion for the sick". Research confirms animal interaction can impact both physical and psychological aspects of the patients status. Typically offered to in-patient areas where the environment is stable, animal assisted therapy has been offered in what would be considered alternative settings. However, the how-to manual of standards for these areas is still being written. This Magnet recognized community hospital established an animal assisted therapy program in 2007. Soon after the benefits of the program were realized, we began investigation into the possibility of expanding the animal visits to the Pediatric Emergency Department. Considerations needed to include how to determine patients' eligibility for visits, the challenges of the physical environment, and the ability to stop or cancel visits if indicated by critical patient issues within the department. Program Guidelines: 1) Scheduled times for animal visits 2) Patients screened for eligibility 3) Nurse driven, parental consent obtained 4) Patient/family prepared for visit, hand-out overview of program guidelines 5) Hygiene considerations after animal interactions. Outcomes: 1) Feedback reflects high patient/family satisfaction with program 2) Increased frequency of scheduled visits due to positive feedback 3) Positive feedback from animal handlers assigned to area 4) Increased staff satisfaction. Future: 1) Additional expansion of scheduled visit times 2) Expand program to Main Emergency Department 3) Consider formal research project 4) Consider animal visits with staff focus. References: DiSalvo, Heidi MPH a; Haiduven, Donna BSN, MSN, PhD a,b; Johnson, Nancy BSN, MSN b; Reyes, Valentine V. BSN b; Hench, Carmen P. BSN b; Shaw, Rosemary OT b; Stevens, David A. MD b Who let the dogs out? Infection control did: Utility of dogs in health care settings and infection control aspects. [Article.]AJIC: American Journal of Infection Control. 34(5):301-307, June 2006.; Hooker, Shirley D. RN, BSN; Holbrook Freeman, Linda RN, DNS; Stewart, Pamela RN, BSN Pet Therapy Research: A Historical Review. [Article.]Holistic Nursing Practice. 17(1):17-23, October 2002.; Kathie M. RN, MN, CCRN *; Gawlinski, Anna RN, DNSc, CS-ACNP + Animal-Assisted Therapy: The Human-Animal Bond. [Miscellaneous Article.]AACN Clinical Issues: Advanced Practice in Acute & Critical Care. Complementary and Alternative Therapies. 11(1):139-149, February 2000.; Stanley-Hermanns, Melinda MSN, RN,BC; Miller, Julie BSN, RN, CCRN Animal-Assisted Therapy: Domestic animals aren't merely pets. To some, they can be healers. [Article.]AJN, American Journal of Nursing. 102(10):69-76, October 2002.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:26:38Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:26:38Z-
dc.conference.date2009en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationLouisville, Kentucky, USAen_US
dc.description"Magnet: Inspiring Innovation, Achieving Outcomes" was the theme and "Explore the relationship among leadership, innovation, and nursing practice outcomes" was the goal of the 13th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 1-3 October, 2009 in Louisville, Kentucky, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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