2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182493
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Keys to Engaging Staff in Quality Improvement
Author(s):
Hancock, Beverly; Vaught, Laura; Llewellyn, Jane
Author Details:
Beverly Hancock, MS, RN-C, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois, USA, email: Beverly_Hancock@rush.edu; Laura Vaught, RN; Jane Llewellyn, PhD, RN, CNAA
Abstract:
Podium Presentation: BRIEF DESCRIPTION: Engaging staff in quality improvement can be a challenge. This presentation will describe the quality improvement program at an academic medical center that resulted in high staff involvement. Elements for engaging staff in quality, structures for success, and examples of staff directed innovation will be discussed. ABSTRACT: Engaging staff in quality improvement can be a challenge. Lack of interest and time constraints can be barriers to full staff involvement. This presentation will describe the robust quality improvement program at a large, urban academic medical center that has resulted in a high level of staff involvement. Our shared governance structure and Education/Quality department provide the foundation for involvement, engaging staff through education on quality methodology and exposure to quality initiatives. Seeing the practical application of quality, staff are able to identify innovative evidence based initiatives on their unit. The result is active staff participation on the quality committees and every unit having at least one active quality initiative at all times. Staff are able to use the QI process to develop projects that are pertinent to their practice and to transition from a QI project into a research project when appropriate. This presentation will highlight strategic elements including: 1) Visible involvement by the CNO in quality activities. The CNO sets the example for involvement of all staff and holds staff accountable for involvement. 2) A division level comprehensive quality coordinating committee, chaired by the CNO, consists of staff nurses, nursing directors, education/quality coordinators, shared governance committee chairs, and ad hoc members from quality related departments in the medical center. These dynamic meetings provide a forum for dialogue on patient care issues. 3) Unit and department level quality committees composed of staff nurses and the unit or department manager. Unit issues, quality data and evidence based initiatives are discussed at these meeting, along with formal peer reviews of incidents. 4) A nursing education and quality department composed of masters prepared nurses who have a dual role in education and quality. These nurses provide just in time training on quality methodology, support units in conducting quality improvement initiatives, and keep staff development programs current by integrating quality into education. This help staff see the practical application of quality data. 5) An annual QI training workshop to develop staff nurses as experts in quality, along with mentoring by Education/Quality nurses, unit managers and Clinical Nurse Specialists. 6) Job descriptions which include involvement in quality activities.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2008
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Salt Lake City, Utah, USA
Description:
The 12th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 15-17 October, 2008 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleKeys to Engaging Staff in Quality Improvementen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHancock, Beverlyen_US
dc.contributor.authorVaught, Lauraen_US
dc.contributor.authorLlewellyn, Janeen_US
dc.author.detailsBeverly Hancock, MS, RN-C, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois, USA, email: Beverly_Hancock@rush.edu; Laura Vaught, RN; Jane Llewellyn, PhD, RN, CNAAen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182493-
dc.description.abstractPodium Presentation: BRIEF DESCRIPTION: Engaging staff in quality improvement can be a challenge. This presentation will describe the quality improvement program at an academic medical center that resulted in high staff involvement. Elements for engaging staff in quality, structures for success, and examples of staff directed innovation will be discussed. ABSTRACT: Engaging staff in quality improvement can be a challenge. Lack of interest and time constraints can be barriers to full staff involvement. This presentation will describe the robust quality improvement program at a large, urban academic medical center that has resulted in a high level of staff involvement. Our shared governance structure and Education/Quality department provide the foundation for involvement, engaging staff through education on quality methodology and exposure to quality initiatives. Seeing the practical application of quality, staff are able to identify innovative evidence based initiatives on their unit. The result is active staff participation on the quality committees and every unit having at least one active quality initiative at all times. Staff are able to use the QI process to develop projects that are pertinent to their practice and to transition from a QI project into a research project when appropriate. This presentation will highlight strategic elements including: 1) Visible involvement by the CNO in quality activities. The CNO sets the example for involvement of all staff and holds staff accountable for involvement. 2) A division level comprehensive quality coordinating committee, chaired by the CNO, consists of staff nurses, nursing directors, education/quality coordinators, shared governance committee chairs, and ad hoc members from quality related departments in the medical center. These dynamic meetings provide a forum for dialogue on patient care issues. 3) Unit and department level quality committees composed of staff nurses and the unit or department manager. Unit issues, quality data and evidence based initiatives are discussed at these meeting, along with formal peer reviews of incidents. 4) A nursing education and quality department composed of masters prepared nurses who have a dual role in education and quality. These nurses provide just in time training on quality methodology, support units in conducting quality improvement initiatives, and keep staff development programs current by integrating quality into education. This help staff see the practical application of quality data. 5) An annual QI training workshop to develop staff nurses as experts in quality, along with mentoring by Education/Quality nurses, unit managers and Clinical Nurse Specialists. 6) Job descriptions which include involvement in quality activities.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:26:41Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:26:41Z-
dc.conference.date2008en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationSalt Lake City, Utah, USAen_US
dc.descriptionThe 12th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 15-17 October, 2008 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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