2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182494
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Impact of Bar Code Medication Administration on Nurses' Time
Author(s):
Hanson, Andrew; Cole, Therese
Author Details:
Andrew Hanson, BSN, RN, CCRN-CSC, Froedtert Hospital, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, USA, email: ahanson@fmlh.edu; Therese Cole, RN, OCN
Abstract:
Poster Presentation: Background and Significance: Nurses spend up to 40% of their work time administering medications. It has been proposed that technological advancements, such as use of bar-code medication administration (BCMA), could contribute to decreasing the risk of medication errors. Research focusing on implementation of BCMA technology has occurred concomitantly with implementation of an electronic medication administration process. The results of these studies indicate technology has resulted in positive patient outcomes but longer administration times. No study has examined the implementation of BCMA with an electronic medication system already in place. Purpose: The purpose of this study is to evaluate the impact of BCMA on medication administration time. Method: A pretest and posttest descriptive observational design was conducted with observations obtained prior to initiation of bar coding and 3 months later. Sample Description: The sample consisted of patients admitted to a medical or surgical unit and their nurses. The unit of analysis for this study was Medication Administration Episodes. An episode was defined as a nurse giving medication(s) at any singular point in time. Setting: This study took place on two medical/surgical units averaging 10,067 and 15,492 medications per month. Procedure: Written consent was obtained for every nurse and patient participating in an observation. An observation protocol was developed and observers were trained and periodically monitored for adherence to protocol. A standardized observation form was used. Time was measured via a stop watch. Each medication administration episode was then entered into Access Database and transferred to SPSS 14 for analysis. Results/Outcomes: All data have been collected and are currently being analyzed. Differences in time pre to post will be calculated for each medication episode. Time differences will be evaluated to determine whether or not the time difference is a function of change in...[Please contact the primary investigator for more information about this poster presentation.] REFERENCES:
Armitage, G., & Knapman, H. (2003). Adverse events in drug administration: a literature review. Journal of Nursing Management, 11, 130-140. Larrabee , S., & Brown, M. (2003). Recognizing the institutional benefits of bar-code point-of-care technology. Joint Commission Journal of Quality and Safety, 29, 345-350. Tang , F., Sheu, J., Yu, S., Wei, L., & Chen, C. (2007). Nurses relate the contributing factors involved in medication errors. Journal of Clinical Nursing, 16, 447-457.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2008
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Salt Lake City, Utah, USA
Description:
The 12th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 15-17 October, 2008 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Impact of Bar Code Medication Administration on Nurses' Timeen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHanson, Andrewen_US
dc.contributor.authorCole, Thereseen_US
dc.author.detailsAndrew Hanson, BSN, RN, CCRN-CSC, Froedtert Hospital, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, USA, email: ahanson@fmlh.edu; Therese Cole, RN, OCNen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182494-
dc.description.abstractPoster Presentation: Background and Significance: Nurses spend up to 40% of their work time administering medications. It has been proposed that technological advancements, such as use of bar-code medication administration (BCMA), could contribute to decreasing the risk of medication errors. Research focusing on implementation of BCMA technology has occurred concomitantly with implementation of an electronic medication administration process. The results of these studies indicate technology has resulted in positive patient outcomes but longer administration times. No study has examined the implementation of BCMA with an electronic medication system already in place. Purpose: The purpose of this study is to evaluate the impact of BCMA on medication administration time. Method: A pretest and posttest descriptive observational design was conducted with observations obtained prior to initiation of bar coding and 3 months later. Sample Description: The sample consisted of patients admitted to a medical or surgical unit and their nurses. The unit of analysis for this study was Medication Administration Episodes. An episode was defined as a nurse giving medication(s) at any singular point in time. Setting: This study took place on two medical/surgical units averaging 10,067 and 15,492 medications per month. Procedure: Written consent was obtained for every nurse and patient participating in an observation. An observation protocol was developed and observers were trained and periodically monitored for adherence to protocol. A standardized observation form was used. Time was measured via a stop watch. Each medication administration episode was then entered into Access Database and transferred to SPSS 14 for analysis. Results/Outcomes: All data have been collected and are currently being analyzed. Differences in time pre to post will be calculated for each medication episode. Time differences will be evaluated to determine whether or not the time difference is a function of change in...[Please contact the primary investigator for more information about this poster presentation.] REFERENCES:<br/>Armitage, G., & Knapman, H. (2003). Adverse events in drug administration: a literature review. Journal of Nursing Management, 11, 130-140. Larrabee , S., & Brown, M. (2003). Recognizing the institutional benefits of bar-code point-of-care technology. Joint Commission Journal of Quality and Safety, 29, 345-350. Tang , F., Sheu, J., Yu, S., Wei, L., & Chen, C. (2007). Nurses relate the contributing factors involved in medication errors. Journal of Clinical Nursing, 16, 447-457.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:26:43Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:26:43Z-
dc.conference.date2008en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationSalt Lake City, Utah, USAen_US
dc.descriptionThe 12th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 15-17 October, 2008 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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