2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182499
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Theory of Human Caring as a Guide for Practice and Research
Author(s):
Hill, Karen
Author Details:
Karen Hill, RN, MSN, CNAA, Central Baptist Hospital, Lexington, Kentucky, USA, email: khill@bhsi.com
Abstract:
Podium Presentation: BRIEF DESCRIPTION: This session will describe the process of identifying and incorporating a theoretical framework to guide all practice activities in a 371 bed acute care institution. Practice activities include providing excellent nursing care and conducting research. Outcomes include several evidence-based initiatives and research projects. ABSTRACT: This abstract describes the process of supporting excellence in nursing practice by incorporating a theory that provides a foundation for practice and research. Excellence in nursing practice in this 371 bed, acute care institution is "the use of a caring centered environment to optimize health and wellness." Nurses support role development, creativity and risk-taking. They are scientists, scholars and clinicians. Each role requires a p hilosophy or model to guide relevant activities. In relation to research, a theoretical framework is essential (1). Given that nurses are increasingly involved in providing evidence-based care, they engaged in a process to identify and integrate a model into practice. The Magnet Team initiated the activities. Assumptions of the team included: a) people and organizations have beliefs that shape behavior, b) philosophies of nursing and the organization should be congruent, c) the theoretical framework selected should reflect nurses' beliefs and values, and d) theoretical concepts should be readily understood. The process of identifying and incorporating a theoretical framework involved numerous healthcare professionals. Nurse leaders, chaplains and educators examined philosophical issues raised by Magnet Standards and the organization's mission/philosophy. Two fundamental ideas emerged. The model needed to reflect a hospital history of compassion and an emphasis on growth rather than maintenance. Watson's Theory of Human Caring (2) was selected. Initially, five of Watson's carative factors (3) were identified. Installation of faith and hope, cultivation of sensitivity, development of helping-trusting relationships, use of scientific problem solving and promotion of interpersonal teaching-learning, were presented as concepts for integration within research and practice. Strategies to engage nurses include: distribution of posters, Watson's presentations, development of a Healing Community Team, and opportunities for caregivers to tell their "stories". Research projects that evolved include: testing of a succession planning manual for nurses, interventions to prevent hypothermia among neonates and the evaluation of study groups for nurses seeking certification. The goal of integrating a model that would provide a theoretical foundation for practice and research has been reached. Adoption of this theoretical framework has positively impacted practice and research throughout the hospital and community. REFERENCES: (1) Wood, M.J., & Ross-Kerr, J.C. (2006). Basic steps in planning nursing research. Sudbury, MA: Jones and Bartlett Publishers. (2) Watson, J (2005). Caring science as a sacred science. Philadelphia: F.A. Davis Company. (3) Watson, J. (1999). Nursing: Human science and human care. Sudbury, MA: Jones and Bartlett Publishers.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2008
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Salt Lake City, Utah, USA
Description:
The 12th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 15-17 October, 2008 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Theory of Human Caring as a Guide for Practice and Researchen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHill, Karenen_US
dc.author.detailsKaren Hill, RN, MSN, CNAA, Central Baptist Hospital, Lexington, Kentucky, USA, email: khill@bhsi.comen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182499-
dc.description.abstractPodium Presentation: BRIEF DESCRIPTION: This session will describe the process of identifying and incorporating a theoretical framework to guide all practice activities in a 371 bed acute care institution. Practice activities include providing excellent nursing care and conducting research. Outcomes include several evidence-based initiatives and research projects. ABSTRACT: This abstract describes the process of supporting excellence in nursing practice by incorporating a theory that provides a foundation for practice and research. Excellence in nursing practice in this 371 bed, acute care institution is "the use of a caring centered environment to optimize health and wellness." Nurses support role development, creativity and risk-taking. They are scientists, scholars and clinicians. Each role requires a p hilosophy or model to guide relevant activities. In relation to research, a theoretical framework is essential (1). Given that nurses are increasingly involved in providing evidence-based care, they engaged in a process to identify and integrate a model into practice. The Magnet Team initiated the activities. Assumptions of the team included: a) people and organizations have beliefs that shape behavior, b) philosophies of nursing and the organization should be congruent, c) the theoretical framework selected should reflect nurses' beliefs and values, and d) theoretical concepts should be readily understood. The process of identifying and incorporating a theoretical framework involved numerous healthcare professionals. Nurse leaders, chaplains and educators examined philosophical issues raised by Magnet Standards and the organization's mission/philosophy. Two fundamental ideas emerged. The model needed to reflect a hospital history of compassion and an emphasis on growth rather than maintenance. Watson's Theory of Human Caring (2) was selected. Initially, five of Watson's carative factors (3) were identified. Installation of faith and hope, cultivation of sensitivity, development of helping-trusting relationships, use of scientific problem solving and promotion of interpersonal teaching-learning, were presented as concepts for integration within research and practice. Strategies to engage nurses include: distribution of posters, Watson's presentations, development of a Healing Community Team, and opportunities for caregivers to tell their "stories". Research projects that evolved include: testing of a succession planning manual for nurses, interventions to prevent hypothermia among neonates and the evaluation of study groups for nurses seeking certification. The goal of integrating a model that would provide a theoretical foundation for practice and research has been reached. Adoption of this theoretical framework has positively impacted practice and research throughout the hospital and community. REFERENCES: (1) Wood, M.J., & Ross-Kerr, J.C. (2006). Basic steps in planning nursing research. Sudbury, MA: Jones and Bartlett Publishers. (2) Watson, J (2005). Caring science as a sacred science. Philadelphia: F.A. Davis Company. (3) Watson, J. (1999). Nursing: Human science and human care. Sudbury, MA: Jones and Bartlett Publishers.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:26:56Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:26:56Z-
dc.conference.date2008en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationSalt Lake City, Utah, USAen_US
dc.descriptionThe 12th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 15-17 October, 2008 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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