2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182502
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Most Meaningful PRESENT of All: Family PRESENCE at the Bedside
Author(s):
Hitchings, Kim; Good, Karen
Author Details:
Kim Hitchings, MSN, RN, CNAA, BC, Lehigh Valley Hospital and Health Network, Allentown, Pennsylvania, USA, email: Kim.Hitchings@lvh.com; Karen Good, MSN, RN, CNA, BC
Abstract:
Poster Presentation: Introduction: Family presence is most commonly defined in the literature as the presence of family in a patient care area, in a location that allows visual or physical contact with the patient. Family is identified as relatives or significant others with whom the patient shares an established relationship. Multiple professional healthcare organizations indicate support for the option of family presence. The premise is that by allowing the family to be present and vigilant, optimal outcomes for the patient and the family are achieved. Opportunities for Improvement: Though the evidence strongly supports family presence throughout the health care continuum, few healthcare settings in the United States formally commit to and embrace this concept. Reasonable concerns associated with family presence, particularly in the acute care setting, include: increased physiologic stress for the patient; barriers to provision of care; exhaustion of family; and, the risk of increased liability. Strategy: Family presence was identified more than two years ago as a core value for an academic, community health network's journey to create the ideal patient and family centered experience. From the outset, family presence was differentiated from 'open visitation.' Actions to date in the development of a culture that values and embraces family presence and involvement include: heightened awareness; strategic plan and infrastructure development; facility environmental enhancements; and, family presence in both traditional and non-traditional settings. Outcomes: Designated specific outcomes include: organization standards and service area guidelines; family presence during trauma resuscitation, in the post anesthesia recovery unit, and in the operating room during organ procurement; research projects associated with family presence during trauma resuscitation and in Pediatrics; a Professional Caregiver's Plan for Resiliency; Family Faculty; and, a Patient/Family Advisory Council...[Please contact the primary investigator for more information about this poster presentation.] REFERENCES: 1) American Academy of Pediatrics, Committee on Hospital Care. (2003). Policy statement: Family-centered care and the pediatrician's role. Pediatrics, 112, 691-696. 2) American Association of Critical-Care Nurses. (2004, November). Practice alert: Family presence during CPR and invasive procedures. Retrieved January 29, 2008, from http://www.aacn.org. 3) The American Heart Association in collaboration with the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation. (2000). Guidelines 2000 for cardiopulmonary resuscitation and emergency cardiovascular care: International consensus on science. Circulation, 102(8 Suppl.), A3-I370. 4) Berwick, D. & Kotagal, M. (2004, August). Restricted visiting hours in ICUs. The Journal of the American Medical Association, 292(6), 736-737. 5) Clark, A., Aldridge, M., Guzzetta, C., Nyquist-Heist, P., Loper, P., Meyers, T. & Voelmeck, W. (2005). Family Presence During Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation. Critical Care Nurse Clinics of America, 17, 23-32. 6) Emergency Nurses Association. (2001). Presenting the option for family presence (2nd ed.). Des Plaines, IL: Author. 7) Slota, M., Shearn, D., Potersnak, K. & Haas, L. (2003, May). Perspectives on family-centered, flexible visitation in the intensive care unit setting. Critical Care Medicine, 31(5), S362-S366...[Please contact the primary investigator for additional references.]
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2008
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Salt Lake City, Utah, USA
Description:
The 12th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 15-17 October, 2008 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Most Meaningful PRESENT of All: Family PRESENCE at the Bedsideen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHitchings, Kimen_US
dc.contributor.authorGood, Karenen_US
dc.author.detailsKim Hitchings, MSN, RN, CNAA, BC, Lehigh Valley Hospital and Health Network, Allentown, Pennsylvania, USA, email: Kim.Hitchings@lvh.com; Karen Good, MSN, RN, CNA, BCen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182502-
dc.description.abstractPoster Presentation: Introduction: Family presence is most commonly defined in the literature as the presence of family in a patient care area, in a location that allows visual or physical contact with the patient. Family is identified as relatives or significant others with whom the patient shares an established relationship. Multiple professional healthcare organizations indicate support for the option of family presence. The premise is that by allowing the family to be present and vigilant, optimal outcomes for the patient and the family are achieved. Opportunities for Improvement: Though the evidence strongly supports family presence throughout the health care continuum, few healthcare settings in the United States formally commit to and embrace this concept. Reasonable concerns associated with family presence, particularly in the acute care setting, include: increased physiologic stress for the patient; barriers to provision of care; exhaustion of family; and, the risk of increased liability. Strategy: Family presence was identified more than two years ago as a core value for an academic, community health network's journey to create the ideal patient and family centered experience. From the outset, family presence was differentiated from 'open visitation.' Actions to date in the development of a culture that values and embraces family presence and involvement include: heightened awareness; strategic plan and infrastructure development; facility environmental enhancements; and, family presence in both traditional and non-traditional settings. Outcomes: Designated specific outcomes include: organization standards and service area guidelines; family presence during trauma resuscitation, in the post anesthesia recovery unit, and in the operating room during organ procurement; research projects associated with family presence during trauma resuscitation and in Pediatrics; a Professional Caregiver's Plan for Resiliency; Family Faculty; and, a Patient/Family Advisory Council...[Please contact the primary investigator for more information about this poster presentation.] REFERENCES: 1) American Academy of Pediatrics, Committee on Hospital Care. (2003). Policy statement: Family-centered care and the pediatrician's role. Pediatrics, 112, 691-696. 2) American Association of Critical-Care Nurses. (2004, November). Practice alert: Family presence during CPR and invasive procedures. Retrieved January 29, 2008, from http://www.aacn.org. 3) The American Heart Association in collaboration with the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation. (2000). Guidelines 2000 for cardiopulmonary resuscitation and emergency cardiovascular care: International consensus on science. Circulation, 102(8 Suppl.), A3-I370. 4) Berwick, D. & Kotagal, M. (2004, August). Restricted visiting hours in ICUs. The Journal of the American Medical Association, 292(6), 736-737. 5) Clark, A., Aldridge, M., Guzzetta, C., Nyquist-Heist, P., Loper, P., Meyers, T. & Voelmeck, W. (2005). Family Presence During Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation. Critical Care Nurse Clinics of America, 17, 23-32. 6) Emergency Nurses Association. (2001). Presenting the option for family presence (2nd ed.). Des Plaines, IL: Author. 7) Slota, M., Shearn, D., Potersnak, K. & Haas, L. (2003, May). Perspectives on family-centered, flexible visitation in the intensive care unit setting. Critical Care Medicine, 31(5), S362-S366...[Please contact the primary investigator for additional references.]en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:27:05Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:27:05Z-
dc.conference.date2008en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationSalt Lake City, Utah, USAen_US
dc.descriptionThe 12th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 15-17 October, 2008 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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