2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182504
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Implementation of a Pediatric Palliative Care Program
Author(s):
Hubble, Rosemary; Spencer, Tonja
Author Details:
Rosemary Hubble, RN, MA, Mdiv, Children's Mercy Hospital & Clinics, Kansas City, Missouri, USA, email: rhubble@cmh.edu; Tonja Spencer, RN
Abstract:
Poster Presentation: Background: There are few models which outline best practice for providing inpatient pediatric palliative care. Care for the estimated 54,000 children who die each year in the United States has been described as fragmented, inconsistent and not culturally sensitive. (1) To address these concerns, The Pediatric Comfort Care Team (PACCT) was developed and implemented at this hospital. PACCT aims to coordinate care for children with life-threatening or life-limiting conditions who are at risk of dying in a five year period. The outcome of this coordination is enhancement of the healthcare, psychosocial and spiritual needs of these children and their family members. The purpose of this presentation is to illustrate the model used to develop this program and to present the outcomes achieved by the PACCT. Clinical Challenge: Historically, approximately 185 children who receive healthcare at this hospital die annually. The complexity of the care required, coupled with the multitude of services received, resulted in challenges in identification and providing care using a palliative care philosophy. Knowledge regarding the philosophy of palliative care and the ability to provide this care along with treatment was the greatest educational barrier. Method: A nurse driven program model was chosen which identifies the child's interdisciplinary primary care team and then works collegially with this team rather than the usual palliative care team model of a separate interdisciplinary team. Gradual implementation over two years took place. Results: Since its inception, over 420 children have received services coordinated by the PACCT. Program goals encompass the areas of: 1. clinical application, 2. education, and 3. research. Discussion: Clinical application has obtained overwhelming success reflected both in the numbers of referrals received throughout the hospital and by satisfaction surveys. Educational goals reflect the ability of the PACCT members to...[Please contact the primary investigator for more information about this poster presentation.] REFERENCES: Browning, D. (2002). To show our humanness -- relationship and communication competence in pediatric palliative care. Bioethics Forum, 18, 23-28.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2008
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Salt Lake City, Utah, USA
Description:
The 12th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 15-17 October, 2008 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleImplementation of a Pediatric Palliative Care Programen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHubble, Rosemaryen_US
dc.contributor.authorSpencer, Tonjaen_US
dc.author.detailsRosemary Hubble, RN, MA, Mdiv, Children's Mercy Hospital & Clinics, Kansas City, Missouri, USA, email: rhubble@cmh.edu; Tonja Spencer, RNen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182504-
dc.description.abstractPoster Presentation: Background: There are few models which outline best practice for providing inpatient pediatric palliative care. Care for the estimated 54,000 children who die each year in the United States has been described as fragmented, inconsistent and not culturally sensitive. (1) To address these concerns, The Pediatric Comfort Care Team (PACCT) was developed and implemented at this hospital. PACCT aims to coordinate care for children with life-threatening or life-limiting conditions who are at risk of dying in a five year period. The outcome of this coordination is enhancement of the healthcare, psychosocial and spiritual needs of these children and their family members. The purpose of this presentation is to illustrate the model used to develop this program and to present the outcomes achieved by the PACCT. Clinical Challenge: Historically, approximately 185 children who receive healthcare at this hospital die annually. The complexity of the care required, coupled with the multitude of services received, resulted in challenges in identification and providing care using a palliative care philosophy. Knowledge regarding the philosophy of palliative care and the ability to provide this care along with treatment was the greatest educational barrier. Method: A nurse driven program model was chosen which identifies the child's interdisciplinary primary care team and then works collegially with this team rather than the usual palliative care team model of a separate interdisciplinary team. Gradual implementation over two years took place. Results: Since its inception, over 420 children have received services coordinated by the PACCT. Program goals encompass the areas of: 1. clinical application, 2. education, and 3. research. Discussion: Clinical application has obtained overwhelming success reflected both in the numbers of referrals received throughout the hospital and by satisfaction surveys. Educational goals reflect the ability of the PACCT members to...[Please contact the primary investigator for more information about this poster presentation.] REFERENCES: Browning, D. (2002). To show our humanness -- relationship and communication competence in pediatric palliative care. Bioethics Forum, 18, 23-28.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:27:10Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:27:10Z-
dc.conference.date2008en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationSalt Lake City, Utah, USAen_US
dc.descriptionThe 12th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 15-17 October, 2008 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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