2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182505
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Nursing Bioethics Rounds: An Agent of Change and Professional Growth
Author(s):
Huber, Cecilia; Dennison, Carol
Author Details:
Cecilia Huber, RN, BSN, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio, USA, email: cecilia131@sbcglobal.net; Carol Dennison, RN, MSN, CCRN
Abstract:
Poster Presentation: Clinical Scenario: She was a 34 year old Amish mother of 3. The bone marrow transplant had worked but the fungus in her sinuses had spread to her other eye and ear. She was dying and she didn't know. The nurses were devastated with the news that further surgery was futile. Would her husband tell her she was dying? What about her small children? Would the Amish elders allow them to visit? Unrelieved moral distress creates an unhealthy work environment that leads to job dissatisfaction and 'burnout'. It has a direct, negative impact on staff turnover. In our medical intensive care unit (MICU), the Shared Governance Council frequently heard stories of frustration and moral distress. The nurses were upset with ongoing conflict between 'care' and 'cure'. In an effort to address these concerns, a monthly forum of Nursing Bioethics Rounds was established. The rounds are loosely structured meetings between nurses and the medical director. All meetings are moderated by our director of clinical bioethics and facilitated by one of our nurse practitioners. Discussions focus on problem solving. Through open dialogue, several sources of frustration were identified. Our nurses felt powerless to change the plan of care. Nurses also perceived delays in addressing end-of-life issues and there was concern that not all patients were receiving adequate pain/anxiety control. From an initial goal of relieving moral distress, we have found that the rounds reinforce ethical principles through discussion of real-life cases. They provide a mechanism for open, direct, excellent communication between our nurses and the MICU medical director. Nurses are feeling more empowered. An unexpected benefit is that discussion points help identify topics for unit-education projects. As a result of these rounds, we have established a multidisciplinary committee to look at our care of the chronically critically ill. Cases discussed have been presented at formal Pulmonary Morbidity & Mortality...[Please contact the primary investigator for more information about this poster presentation.] REFERENCES: American Association of Critical Care Nurses. (2006) AACN position statement: Moral distress. http://www.aacn.org/aacn/pubpolcy.nsf/Files/MDPS/$file/Moral%20Distress%20_1_7.8.06.pdf . Accessed January 21, 2008. Breen, C., Abernethy, A., Abbott, K., & Tulsky, J. (2001). Conflict associated with decisions to limit life-sustaining treatment in intensive care units. Journal of General Internal Medicine 16(5), 283-289. Cronqvist, A., & Nystrom, M. (2007). A theoretical argumentation on the consequences of moral stress. Journal of Nursing Management 15, 458-465. Lyckholm, L. (2001). Dealing with stress, burnout, and grief in the practice of oncology. The Lancet Oncology 2(12), 750-755. Poncet, M.C, Toullic, P., Papazian, L., Kentish-Barnes, N., Timsit, J., Pochard, F. et al. (2007). Burnout syndrome in critical care nursing staff. American Journal of Respiratory Critical Care 175, 698-704.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2008
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Salt Lake City, Utah, USA
Description:
The 12th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 15-17 October, 2008 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNursing Bioethics Rounds: An Agent of Change and Professional Growthen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHuber, Ceciliaen_US
dc.contributor.authorDennison, Carolen_US
dc.author.detailsCecilia Huber, RN, BSN, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio, USA, email: cecilia131@sbcglobal.net; Carol Dennison, RN, MSN, CCRNen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182505-
dc.description.abstractPoster Presentation: Clinical Scenario: She was a 34 year old Amish mother of 3. The bone marrow transplant had worked but the fungus in her sinuses had spread to her other eye and ear. She was dying and she didn't know. The nurses were devastated with the news that further surgery was futile. Would her husband tell her she was dying? What about her small children? Would the Amish elders allow them to visit? Unrelieved moral distress creates an unhealthy work environment that leads to job dissatisfaction and 'burnout'. It has a direct, negative impact on staff turnover. In our medical intensive care unit (MICU), the Shared Governance Council frequently heard stories of frustration and moral distress. The nurses were upset with ongoing conflict between 'care' and 'cure'. In an effort to address these concerns, a monthly forum of Nursing Bioethics Rounds was established. The rounds are loosely structured meetings between nurses and the medical director. All meetings are moderated by our director of clinical bioethics and facilitated by one of our nurse practitioners. Discussions focus on problem solving. Through open dialogue, several sources of frustration were identified. Our nurses felt powerless to change the plan of care. Nurses also perceived delays in addressing end-of-life issues and there was concern that not all patients were receiving adequate pain/anxiety control. From an initial goal of relieving moral distress, we have found that the rounds reinforce ethical principles through discussion of real-life cases. They provide a mechanism for open, direct, excellent communication between our nurses and the MICU medical director. Nurses are feeling more empowered. An unexpected benefit is that discussion points help identify topics for unit-education projects. As a result of these rounds, we have established a multidisciplinary committee to look at our care of the chronically critically ill. Cases discussed have been presented at formal Pulmonary Morbidity & Mortality...[Please contact the primary investigator for more information about this poster presentation.] REFERENCES: American Association of Critical Care Nurses. (2006) AACN position statement: Moral distress. http://www.aacn.org/aacn/pubpolcy.nsf/Files/MDPS/$file/Moral%20Distress%20_1_7.8.06.pdf . Accessed January 21, 2008. Breen, C., Abernethy, A., Abbott, K., & Tulsky, J. (2001). Conflict associated with decisions to limit life-sustaining treatment in intensive care units. Journal of General Internal Medicine 16(5), 283-289. Cronqvist, A., & Nystrom, M. (2007). A theoretical argumentation on the consequences of moral stress. Journal of Nursing Management 15, 458-465. Lyckholm, L. (2001). Dealing with stress, burnout, and grief in the practice of oncology. The Lancet Oncology 2(12), 750-755. Poncet, M.C, Toullic, P., Papazian, L., Kentish-Barnes, N., Timsit, J., Pochard, F. et al. (2007). Burnout syndrome in critical care nursing staff. American Journal of Respiratory Critical Care 175, 698-704.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:27:13Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:27:13Z-
dc.conference.date2008en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationSalt Lake City, Utah, USAen_US
dc.descriptionThe 12th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 15-17 October, 2008 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.