2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182508
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Assessing the Use of a Reflective Blanket in Managing Post Operative Hypothermia
Author(s):
Humbarger, Kimberly; Kleinpell, Ruth; Pecson, Isabel
Author Details:
Kimberly Humbarger, RN, BSN, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois, USA, email: Kimberly_Humbarger@rush.edu; Ruth Kleinpell, PhD, RN, FAAN; Isabel Pecson, RN
Abstract:
Poster Presentation: Overview: Perioperative thermoregulation is an important area of focus for nursing care as hypothermia has been associated with postoperative surgical site infections, myocardial infarction, and increased chance of blood product administration. Purpose: The purpose of this nursing study was to assess the impact of a reflective blanket (thermolite blanket) as an alternative to the use of multiple warm bath blankets to treat hypothermia in the post anesthesia care unit (PACU). Method: This randomized clinical trial assessed the benefit of using a reflective blanket applied on top of one warmed bath blanket compared to the current care of the use of multiple warmed bath blankets in promoting normothermia in patients in the PACU. Inclusion criteria were age 18 and older and presence of hypothermia (<96 degrees F) upon admission to PACU. Exclusion criteria included age < 18, hypothermia (temperature < 95 degrees F) requiring passive rewarming heat (use of Baer Hugger) or normothermia (temperature > 96 degrees F). A total of 156 patients were randomly assigned to either the reflective blanket treatment group (n=74) or usual care group (n=82). Temperature (axillary, rectal or core) was monitored every 15 minutes until the temperature was > 96 degrees F. Rates of rewarming and time in the PACU were compared between the two groups. Results: Patients ranged in age from 19 to 89 (Mean=53), 58% were female, 59% were Caucasian, 34% African American and 7% Hispanic. There were no differences in the demographic profile of the study groups. Compared to usual care, patients in the treatment group spent more time in the operating room (Mean = 147 versus 108 minutes respectively, p=.004) but required significantly less use of additional blankets for rewarming, both with respect to initial blanket use (Mean= 0 versus 2.7) as well as for subsequent blanket use (Mean = 0 versus 1.25). Patients in the treatment group also required less time to achieve normothermia compared to control (Mean...[Please contact the primary investigator for more information about this poster presentation.] REFERENCES: American Society of PeriAnesthesia Nurses. Clinical guidelines for the prevention of unplanned perioperative hypothermia. 2001 Kurtz A. Sessler DI, Lenhardt R: Perioperative normothermia to reduce the incidence of surgical-wound infection and shorten hospitalization. N Engl J Med 1996; 334:1209-1215. Moss R. and Cork RC. Reflective technology: A new solution for an old problem. Surgical Services Management. 1998; 4:8-10. Mahoney C, Odom J. Maintaining intraoperative normothermia: a meta-analysis of outcomes with cost. AANA Journal. 1999; 67:155-164.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2008
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Salt Lake City, Utah, USA
Description:
The 12th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 15-17 October, 2008 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAssessing the Use of a Reflective Blanket in Managing Post Operative Hypothermiaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHumbarger, Kimberlyen_US
dc.contributor.authorKleinpell, Ruthen_US
dc.contributor.authorPecson, Isabelen_US
dc.author.detailsKimberly Humbarger, RN, BSN, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois, USA, email: Kimberly_Humbarger@rush.edu; Ruth Kleinpell, PhD, RN, FAAN; Isabel Pecson, RNen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182508-
dc.description.abstractPoster Presentation: Overview: Perioperative thermoregulation is an important area of focus for nursing care as hypothermia has been associated with postoperative surgical site infections, myocardial infarction, and increased chance of blood product administration. Purpose: The purpose of this nursing study was to assess the impact of a reflective blanket (thermolite blanket) as an alternative to the use of multiple warm bath blankets to treat hypothermia in the post anesthesia care unit (PACU). Method: This randomized clinical trial assessed the benefit of using a reflective blanket applied on top of one warmed bath blanket compared to the current care of the use of multiple warmed bath blankets in promoting normothermia in patients in the PACU. Inclusion criteria were age 18 and older and presence of hypothermia (&lt;96 degrees F) upon admission to PACU. Exclusion criteria included age &lt; 18, hypothermia (temperature &lt; 95 degrees F) requiring passive rewarming heat (use of Baer Hugger) or normothermia (temperature &gt; 96 degrees F). A total of 156 patients were randomly assigned to either the reflective blanket treatment group (n=74) or usual care group (n=82). Temperature (axillary, rectal or core) was monitored every 15 minutes until the temperature was &gt; 96 degrees F. Rates of rewarming and time in the PACU were compared between the two groups. Results: Patients ranged in age from 19 to 89 (Mean=53), 58% were female, 59% were Caucasian, 34% African American and 7% Hispanic. There were no differences in the demographic profile of the study groups. Compared to usual care, patients in the treatment group spent more time in the operating room (Mean = 147 versus 108 minutes respectively, p=.004) but required significantly less use of additional blankets for rewarming, both with respect to initial blanket use (Mean= 0 versus 2.7) as well as for subsequent blanket use (Mean = 0 versus 1.25). Patients in the treatment group also required less time to achieve normothermia compared to control (Mean...[Please contact the primary investigator for more information about this poster presentation.] REFERENCES: American Society of PeriAnesthesia Nurses. Clinical guidelines for the prevention of unplanned perioperative hypothermia. 2001 Kurtz A. Sessler DI, Lenhardt R: Perioperative normothermia to reduce the incidence of surgical-wound infection and shorten hospitalization. N Engl J Med 1996; 334:1209-1215. Moss R. and Cork RC. Reflective technology: A new solution for an old problem. Surgical Services Management. 1998; 4:8-10. Mahoney C, Odom J. Maintaining intraoperative normothermia: a meta-analysis of outcomes with cost. AANA Journal. 1999; 67:155-164.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:27:22Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:27:22Z-
dc.conference.date2008en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationSalt Lake City, Utah, USAen_US
dc.descriptionThe 12th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 15-17 October, 2008 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.