2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182509
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Prevalence of MRSA: A Patient and Employee Study in a 270-Bed Regional Hospital
Author(s):
Iversen, Nancy; Mellgren, Jennifer
Author Details:
Nancy Iversen, RN, BSN, CIC, Billings Clinic, Billings, Montana, USA, email: niversen@billingsclinic.org; Jennifer Mellgren, MT (ASCP), CIC
Abstract:
Podium Presentation: BRIEF DESCRIPTION: This study describes the prevalence of Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) colonization in the patient and employee population of a 270-bed regional referral hospital. The study also demonstrates MRSA sensitivity differences between two culture techniques. ABSTRACT: Background: Over 50% MRSA infections occur in U.S. hospitals and are associated with increased length of stay, ICU stay and morbidity. The incidence of healthcare-associated MRSA infections in our hospital increased from 0.15 to 0.81 cases per 1000 patient days over 5 years. The purpose of this study was to identify the prevalence of MRSA colonization in our patient and employee population in order to design effective strategies to prevent MRSA transmission. It also compared MRSA colonization rates using traditional culturing techniques and rapid PCR testing. Methods: A prevalence study was performed to include all hospital inpatients (n=217) and employees (n=304) over a 3-week period using traditional culture and rapid PCR testing. The employee study utilized rapid PCR testing only. All patients in the ICU, ATU, Medical and Surgical units were asked to participate in a prevalence study and have a swab performed on both nares. Risk factors such as age, gender, diabetes, hospitalization or long-term care stay within last year, prior antibiotic exposure, or receipt of hemodialysis were obtained from medical records. The employee study included non-clinical staff, support personnel, nursing and providers. Age, gender and discipline were collected at the time of nasal swab. Results: The MRSA colonization rate among patients was 7.8% using traditional culture method and 11.7% using rapid PCR testing. Highest colonization rates were in patients with a diagnosis of diabetes or who were receiving hemodialysis. Patients who were hospitalized or who had a long-term care facility stay in the last year showed a lower colonization rate. Medical and outpatient hemodialysis patients had the highest colonization by unit. The employee colonization rates ranged from 1.3% - 17.2%, with an overall rate of 7.2% and higher in the male gender. The provider group had the highest MRSA colonization rate. Conclusions: The patient study documented an overall Staph aureus colonization rate of 32% (69/217) of which 17/217 were MRSA positive (7.8%). This finding is consistent with other rates that have been reported in the literature. Results documented PCR sensitivity higher (94%) than the traditional culture method (80%). The medical unit had the highest and the ICU had the lowest MRSA colonization rate. The study directed the implementation of active surveillance and initiated the positive deviance approach to stop MRSA transmission by engaging front line nursing staff. REFERENCES: Cosgrove SE, Qi Y, Kaye KS, Harbarth S, Karchmer AW, Carmeli Y. The impact of methicillin resistance in Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia on patient outcomes: mortality, length of stay, and hospital charges. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. 2005;26:166-174. Reed SD, Friedman JY, Engemann JJ, et al. Costs and outcomes among hemodialysis-dependent paties with methicillin resistant or methicillin susceptible Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. 2005;26:175-183.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2008
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Salt Lake City, Utah, USA
Description:
The 12th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 15-17 October, 2008 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePrevalence of MRSA: A Patient and Employee Study in a 270-Bed Regional Hospitalen_GB
dc.contributor.authorIversen, Nancyen_US
dc.contributor.authorMellgren, Jenniferen_US
dc.author.detailsNancy Iversen, RN, BSN, CIC, Billings Clinic, Billings, Montana, USA, email: niversen@billingsclinic.org; Jennifer Mellgren, MT (ASCP), CICen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182509-
dc.description.abstractPodium Presentation: BRIEF DESCRIPTION: This study describes the prevalence of Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) colonization in the patient and employee population of a 270-bed regional referral hospital. The study also demonstrates MRSA sensitivity differences between two culture techniques. ABSTRACT: Background: Over 50% MRSA infections occur in U.S. hospitals and are associated with increased length of stay, ICU stay and morbidity. The incidence of healthcare-associated MRSA infections in our hospital increased from 0.15 to 0.81 cases per 1000 patient days over 5 years. The purpose of this study was to identify the prevalence of MRSA colonization in our patient and employee population in order to design effective strategies to prevent MRSA transmission. It also compared MRSA colonization rates using traditional culturing techniques and rapid PCR testing. Methods: A prevalence study was performed to include all hospital inpatients (n=217) and employees (n=304) over a 3-week period using traditional culture and rapid PCR testing. The employee study utilized rapid PCR testing only. All patients in the ICU, ATU, Medical and Surgical units were asked to participate in a prevalence study and have a swab performed on both nares. Risk factors such as age, gender, diabetes, hospitalization or long-term care stay within last year, prior antibiotic exposure, or receipt of hemodialysis were obtained from medical records. The employee study included non-clinical staff, support personnel, nursing and providers. Age, gender and discipline were collected at the time of nasal swab. Results: The MRSA colonization rate among patients was 7.8% using traditional culture method and 11.7% using rapid PCR testing. Highest colonization rates were in patients with a diagnosis of diabetes or who were receiving hemodialysis. Patients who were hospitalized or who had a long-term care facility stay in the last year showed a lower colonization rate. Medical and outpatient hemodialysis patients had the highest colonization by unit. The employee colonization rates ranged from 1.3% - 17.2%, with an overall rate of 7.2% and higher in the male gender. The provider group had the highest MRSA colonization rate. Conclusions: The patient study documented an overall Staph aureus colonization rate of 32% (69/217) of which 17/217 were MRSA positive (7.8%). This finding is consistent with other rates that have been reported in the literature. Results documented PCR sensitivity higher (94%) than the traditional culture method (80%). The medical unit had the highest and the ICU had the lowest MRSA colonization rate. The study directed the implementation of active surveillance and initiated the positive deviance approach to stop MRSA transmission by engaging front line nursing staff. REFERENCES: Cosgrove SE, Qi Y, Kaye KS, Harbarth S, Karchmer AW, Carmeli Y. The impact of methicillin resistance in Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia on patient outcomes: mortality, length of stay, and hospital charges. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. 2005;26:166-174. Reed SD, Friedman JY, Engemann JJ, et al. Costs and outcomes among hemodialysis-dependent paties with methicillin resistant or methicillin susceptible Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. 2005;26:175-183.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:27:24Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:27:24Z-
dc.conference.date2008en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationSalt Lake City, Utah, USAen_US
dc.descriptionThe 12th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 15-17 October, 2008 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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