2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182511
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Patient Flow: Changing a Culture in a Complex Multi-Campus System
Author(s):
Jenkins, Marjorie
Author Details:
Marjorie Jenkins, Moses Cone Health System, Greensboro, North Carolina, USA, email: marjorie.jenkins@mosescone.com
Abstract:
Podium Presentation: BRIEF DESCRIPTION: Discover how interdisciplinary key stakeholders at a multi-campus healthcare system utilized a Magnet work environment to address patient flow issues and change the culture to free up beds earlier in the day. The end result was a system that allowed capacity to better match demand. ABSTRACT: Patient Flow: Changing a Culture in a Complex Multi-Campus System A fully integrated five-hospital healthcare system recognized the need to address workflow processes for two of its main campuses. Noncompliance with the bed tracking system led to frequent batching of discharges and admissions that resulted in inefficient workflow for nursing units, environmental services, and procedural areas when beds became available in the late afternoon. The Emergency, Post Anesthesia Care, and Cardiac Catheterization departments consistently held patients and Operating rooms were put on hold. The healthcare system was stressed and operating in crisis mode. Patients, physicians and staff satisfaction were negatively impacted. Capitalizing on our Magnet culture, we formed an interdisciplinary team from both hospitals to examine the problems associated with bed batching. The following interdisciplinary team decisions were made: Purchase a bed management system that supported accountability; Develop collective goals among key stakeholders; Centralize patient placement across two hospitals; Redesign flow processes and develop a new single system instead of two separate hospital systems; Implement system in phases to focus on key components required in each phase; Create real time data report detailing successes for each nursing unit; Incorporation of a reward and accountability system for units meeting/not meeting goals; ans Involve senior leadership with tracking and review of department outcomes. A Magnet culture focused on teamwork and engaging all disciplines made this program successful. Outcomes include increased compliance with bed tracking. Not only did nursing departments increase from 60% to 93% compliance, results have been sustained for more than one year. Having real time bed notifications throughout the shift has created a more even distribution of workload for nursing, procedural areas and environmental services. Real time discharge information entered between 8:00 and 10:00 a.m. has increased by 2.5%, gaining 12 beds for ED and PACU admissions early in the morning. Decreasing the number of late discharges by 50% between the hours of 8:00 and 10:00 p.m. has also netted an additional 15 beds earlier in the day. Wait times in the emergency department, post anesthesia care unit, and cardiac catheterization department continue to be positively impacted based on accurate and timely, inpatient bed availability information.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2008
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Salt Lake City, Utah, USA
Description:
The 12th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 15-17 October, 2008 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePatient Flow: Changing a Culture in a Complex Multi-Campus Systemen_GB
dc.contributor.authorJenkins, Marjorieen_US
dc.author.detailsMarjorie Jenkins, Moses Cone Health System, Greensboro, North Carolina, USA, email: marjorie.jenkins@mosescone.comen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182511-
dc.description.abstractPodium Presentation: BRIEF DESCRIPTION: Discover how interdisciplinary key stakeholders at a multi-campus healthcare system utilized a Magnet work environment to address patient flow issues and change the culture to free up beds earlier in the day. The end result was a system that allowed capacity to better match demand. ABSTRACT: Patient Flow: Changing a Culture in a Complex Multi-Campus System A fully integrated five-hospital healthcare system recognized the need to address workflow processes for two of its main campuses. Noncompliance with the bed tracking system led to frequent batching of discharges and admissions that resulted in inefficient workflow for nursing units, environmental services, and procedural areas when beds became available in the late afternoon. The Emergency, Post Anesthesia Care, and Cardiac Catheterization departments consistently held patients and Operating rooms were put on hold. The healthcare system was stressed and operating in crisis mode. Patients, physicians and staff satisfaction were negatively impacted. Capitalizing on our Magnet culture, we formed an interdisciplinary team from both hospitals to examine the problems associated with bed batching. The following interdisciplinary team decisions were made: Purchase a bed management system that supported accountability; Develop collective goals among key stakeholders; Centralize patient placement across two hospitals; Redesign flow processes and develop a new single system instead of two separate hospital systems; Implement system in phases to focus on key components required in each phase; Create real time data report detailing successes for each nursing unit; Incorporation of a reward and accountability system for units meeting/not meeting goals; ans Involve senior leadership with tracking and review of department outcomes. A Magnet culture focused on teamwork and engaging all disciplines made this program successful. Outcomes include increased compliance with bed tracking. Not only did nursing departments increase from 60% to 93% compliance, results have been sustained for more than one year. Having real time bed notifications throughout the shift has created a more even distribution of workload for nursing, procedural areas and environmental services. Real time discharge information entered between 8:00 and 10:00 a.m. has increased by 2.5%, gaining 12 beds for ED and PACU admissions early in the morning. Decreasing the number of late discharges by 50% between the hours of 8:00 and 10:00 p.m. has also netted an additional 15 beds earlier in the day. Wait times in the emergency department, post anesthesia care unit, and cardiac catheterization department continue to be positively impacted based on accurate and timely, inpatient bed availability information.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:27:30Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:27:30Z-
dc.conference.date2008en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationSalt Lake City, Utah, USAen_US
dc.descriptionThe 12th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 15-17 October, 2008 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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