2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182525
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Empowering Nurses to Improve Job Satisfaction Using NDNQI Survey Data
Author(s):
Laband, Eileen; Mahoney, Judith
Author Details:
Eileen Laband, BSN, MBA, RN, CNA, BC, Children's Hospital Boston, Boston, Massachusetts, USA, email: eileen.laband@childrens.harvard.edu; Judith Mahoney, BSN, RN, CNA, BC
Abstract:
Poster Presentation: Purpose: The amount of data in National Database of Nursing Quality Indicators (NDNQI) reports can be overwhelming. Data need to be presented in a straightforward format for easy review. Staff need to be involved in action plan development and implementation to attain improvements in satisfaction. This poster describes one institution's process for engaging staff nurses in using NDNQI data to make improvements in the work environment. Background: Studies have shown a connection between nurse satisfaction and patient outcomes (Aiken, 2002). Recognizing this crucial link, staff nurses and leaders critically evaluate RN satisfaction data to build a favorable practice environment. Compelling evidence in the literature also demonstrates the association of nursing empowerment with greater job satisfaction (Laschinger, 1996, 2000, 2003). The NDNQI survey measures present a unique opportunity for empowering staff nurses with data to effect change and improve job satisfaction. Methods: Data utilization was facilitated by the preparation of unit-specific reports. Tables and graphs contained comparative data from prior surveys and other institutions. Scores were reviewed and data guided staff nurses and leaders in identifying opportunities for improvement, developing meaningful strategies and monitoring attainment of goals. Groups developed action plans that were implemented at the institutional, program and unit level. Through this process, targeted areas experienced increases from 12% to 24% over three years. Findings: At the institutional level, pay was chosen by the Recruitment and Retention Committee because it received the lowest group T-score. Two market adjustments raised salaries an average of 13% and increased satisfaction scores by 12%. In surgical programs, decision-making and autonomy were targeted because the average scores were lower than the average scores for the hospital. Numerous changes recommended by staff and leaders resulted in a 19% increase in...[Please contact the primary investigator for more information about this poster presentation.] REFERENCES: Aiken, L.H., et al. [2002]. Hospital Nurse Staffing and Patient Mortality, Nurse Burnout, and Job Dissatisfaction. JAMA, 288, 1987-1993) Laschinger HKS, Havens DS. Staff nurse work empowerment and perceived control over nursing practice, work satisfaction and work effectiveness. J Nuts Adm. 1996;26(9): 23-75. Laschinger HKS, Finegan J, Shamian J, Casier S. Organizational trust and empowerment in restructured healthcare settings: Effects on staff nurse commitment. J Nurs Adm. 2000; 30(9):413-425. Laschinger HKS, Almost J, Tuer-Hodes, D. Workplace empowerment and Magnet hospital characteristics. J Nurs Adm. 2003; 33 (7/8): 410-422.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2008
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Salt Lake City, Utah, USA
Description:
The 12th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 15-17 October, 2008 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEmpowering Nurses to Improve Job Satisfaction Using NDNQI Survey Dataen_GB
dc.contributor.authorLaband, Eileenen_US
dc.contributor.authorMahoney, Judithen_US
dc.author.detailsEileen Laband, BSN, MBA, RN, CNA, BC, Children's Hospital Boston, Boston, Massachusetts, USA, email: eileen.laband@childrens.harvard.edu; Judith Mahoney, BSN, RN, CNA, BCen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182525-
dc.description.abstractPoster Presentation: Purpose: The amount of data in National Database of Nursing Quality Indicators (NDNQI) reports can be overwhelming. Data need to be presented in a straightforward format for easy review. Staff need to be involved in action plan development and implementation to attain improvements in satisfaction. This poster describes one institution's process for engaging staff nurses in using NDNQI data to make improvements in the work environment. Background: Studies have shown a connection between nurse satisfaction and patient outcomes (Aiken, 2002). Recognizing this crucial link, staff nurses and leaders critically evaluate RN satisfaction data to build a favorable practice environment. Compelling evidence in the literature also demonstrates the association of nursing empowerment with greater job satisfaction (Laschinger, 1996, 2000, 2003). The NDNQI survey measures present a unique opportunity for empowering staff nurses with data to effect change and improve job satisfaction. Methods: Data utilization was facilitated by the preparation of unit-specific reports. Tables and graphs contained comparative data from prior surveys and other institutions. Scores were reviewed and data guided staff nurses and leaders in identifying opportunities for improvement, developing meaningful strategies and monitoring attainment of goals. Groups developed action plans that were implemented at the institutional, program and unit level. Through this process, targeted areas experienced increases from 12% to 24% over three years. Findings: At the institutional level, pay was chosen by the Recruitment and Retention Committee because it received the lowest group T-score. Two market adjustments raised salaries an average of 13% and increased satisfaction scores by 12%. In surgical programs, decision-making and autonomy were targeted because the average scores were lower than the average scores for the hospital. Numerous changes recommended by staff and leaders resulted in a 19% increase in...[Please contact the primary investigator for more information about this poster presentation.] REFERENCES: Aiken, L.H., et al. [2002]. Hospital Nurse Staffing and Patient Mortality, Nurse Burnout, and Job Dissatisfaction. JAMA, 288, 1987-1993) Laschinger HKS, Havens DS. Staff nurse work empowerment and perceived control over nursing practice, work satisfaction and work effectiveness. J Nuts Adm. 1996;26(9): 23-75. Laschinger HKS, Finegan J, Shamian J, Casier S. Organizational trust and empowerment in restructured healthcare settings: Effects on staff nurse commitment. J Nurs Adm. 2000; 30(9):413-425. Laschinger HKS, Almost J, Tuer-Hodes, D. Workplace empowerment and Magnet hospital characteristics. J Nurs Adm. 2003; 33 (7/8): 410-422.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:28:08Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:28:08Z-
dc.conference.date2008en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationSalt Lake City, Utah, USAen_US
dc.descriptionThe 12th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 15-17 October, 2008 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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