2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182528
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Professional Practice Model Development: Process Innovations
Author(s):
Light, Patricia; Himes, Judy; Grosso, Jolene; Smith, Sheila
Author Details:
Patricia Light, Penn State Hershey Medical Center, Hershey, Pennsylvania, USA, email: plight@hmc.psu.edu; Judy Himes; Jolene Grosso, BSN, RN, CPN; Sheila Smith, MSN, RN
Abstract:
Podium Presentation: BRIEF DESCRIPTION: This presentation describes development, implementation, and evaluation of a professional practice and care delivery model that commenced with the Magnet journey. Lessons learned in transitioning to a care delivery model that incorporates direct care nursing within a professional practice nursing model will be shared. ABSTRACT: This presentation describes development, implementation, and evaluation of a professional practice and care delivery model that commenced with the Magnet journey. Initially, the Department of Nursing's care delivery model was primary nursing. Nursing care in this model was inconsistently carried out due to flexible staffing schedules and short patient stays. Additionally, nursing's collaborative role with various disciplines and services made it necessary to look at other models. Findings revealed that a comprehensive professional practice model should be developed first. This process would establish not only a care delivery model but also would move forward all aspects of nursing. The Collaborative Care Transition Model (CCTM) is based on organizational and social systems theory; components of structure, process and outcomes; and emphasizes collaboration, synergy, and communication. The CCTM title implies collaboration among care providers, patients, and families as transitions are made throughout care. Five tenets support the theoretical framework: Patient Family-Centered Care, Quality, Professionalism, Technology, and Evidence-Based Practice. They underpin and guide decision-making, roles, communications, systems, and processes that support nursing care delivery. Nursing staff was involved early in development of the CCTM, and has continued involvement as the model is integrated within the nursing department and adapted to various patient populations. Accountability for operationalization of the care delivery model is set in the direct care role of a Clinical Practice Group Leader (CPGL). CPGLs work each shift and are responsible for building nursing teams, being a resource, and developing staff. CPGLs are clinical experts with exceptional leadership skills. The deliberate and systematic undertaking of the professional practice model and institution of the CPGL role were recognized as exemplars of a Magnet organization. Responsibility for integration and enculturation of the professional practice model resides in the shared governance councils. Issues and ongoing challenges in implementing the professional practice model are presented along with achievement in outcomes for patient and employee satisfaction. Changing organizational structures and processes, and financial resources have influenced the CCTM. We will share lessons learned in transitioning to a professional practice model.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2008
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Salt Lake City, Utah, USA
Description:
The 12th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 15-17 October, 2008 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleProfessional Practice Model Development: Process Innovationsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorLight, Patriciaen_US
dc.contributor.authorHimes, Judyen_US
dc.contributor.authorGrosso, Joleneen_US
dc.contributor.authorSmith, Sheilaen_US
dc.author.detailsPatricia Light, Penn State Hershey Medical Center, Hershey, Pennsylvania, USA, email: plight@hmc.psu.edu; Judy Himes; Jolene Grosso, BSN, RN, CPN; Sheila Smith, MSN, RNen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182528-
dc.description.abstractPodium Presentation: BRIEF DESCRIPTION: This presentation describes development, implementation, and evaluation of a professional practice and care delivery model that commenced with the Magnet journey. Lessons learned in transitioning to a care delivery model that incorporates direct care nursing within a professional practice nursing model will be shared. ABSTRACT: This presentation describes development, implementation, and evaluation of a professional practice and care delivery model that commenced with the Magnet journey. Initially, the Department of Nursing's care delivery model was primary nursing. Nursing care in this model was inconsistently carried out due to flexible staffing schedules and short patient stays. Additionally, nursing's collaborative role with various disciplines and services made it necessary to look at other models. Findings revealed that a comprehensive professional practice model should be developed first. This process would establish not only a care delivery model but also would move forward all aspects of nursing. The Collaborative Care Transition Model (CCTM) is based on organizational and social systems theory; components of structure, process and outcomes; and emphasizes collaboration, synergy, and communication. The CCTM title implies collaboration among care providers, patients, and families as transitions are made throughout care. Five tenets support the theoretical framework: Patient Family-Centered Care, Quality, Professionalism, Technology, and Evidence-Based Practice. They underpin and guide decision-making, roles, communications, systems, and processes that support nursing care delivery. Nursing staff was involved early in development of the CCTM, and has continued involvement as the model is integrated within the nursing department and adapted to various patient populations. Accountability for operationalization of the care delivery model is set in the direct care role of a Clinical Practice Group Leader (CPGL). CPGLs work each shift and are responsible for building nursing teams, being a resource, and developing staff. CPGLs are clinical experts with exceptional leadership skills. The deliberate and systematic undertaking of the professional practice model and institution of the CPGL role were recognized as exemplars of a Magnet organization. Responsibility for integration and enculturation of the professional practice model resides in the shared governance councils. Issues and ongoing challenges in implementing the professional practice model are presented along with achievement in outcomes for patient and employee satisfaction. Changing organizational structures and processes, and financial resources have influenced the CCTM. We will share lessons learned in transitioning to a professional practice model.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:28:16Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:28:16Z-
dc.conference.date2008en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationSalt Lake City, Utah, USAen_US
dc.descriptionThe 12th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 15-17 October, 2008 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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