2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182531
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Making Chemotherapy Administration Safer: Implementation of SmartPump Technology
Author(s):
Livingston, Mylynda
Author Details:
Mylynda Livingston, RN, MS, CNP, Children's Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota, St Paul, Minnesota, USA, email: mylynda.livingston@childrensmn.org
Abstract:
Poster Presentation: Medication safety has become a target of national attention. The Institute of Medicine revealed that medication errors occur most frequently during the prescribing and administering of medications (2006). Chemotherapeutic agents have a high toxicity and narrow therapeutic index. The administration of these agents can be very labor intensive and complex for the healthcare provider. Any step missed or overlooked in the process can lead to an error and have serious repercussions for the patient. The innovative Alaris SmartPump(«) system has been implemented in our institution; it is designed to allow programming of medication upper and lower dose, concentration, and infusion rate limits, or Guardrails. The authors used the SmartPump technology and current Children's Oncology Group (COG) guidelines to develop Guardrails(«) for chemotherapy medications delivered on the SmartPump. The Guardrails («) developed give upper and lower limits of dosing and administration times for chemotherapeutic agents based on the patient's weight or body surface area. Any attempt to program the pump outside of the Guardrails(«) generates an alert for the person administering the medication. Between 7/1/06 and 5/31/07, there were a total of 4400 doses of chemotherapy dispensed to run on the SmartPump using Guardrails(«). Of these doses, 12.4% (544) alarmed with an override error indicating the pump was not programmed correctly: 1) 65% (354) involved the nurse choosing the incorrect dose range for the medication. For example, a nurse chose high dose cytarabine instead of medium dose, 2) 29% (159) of the error alarms were due to doses of medications being rounded incorrectly. We used no rounding rules when developing our Guardrails(«) which is different than the 10% rounding rule we use for our computerized order sets. 3) 6% (31) of error alarms were true medication errors that required review by the nurses before the pump would deliver the medication. In response to the Guard...[Please contact the primary investigator for more information about this poster presentation.]REFERENCES: Institute of Medicine Committee on Identifying and Preventing Medication Errors Board On Health Care Services. (2006). Preventing Medication Errors. The National Academies Press: Washington, D.C.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2008
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Salt Lake City, Utah, USA
Description:
The 12th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 15-17 October, 2008 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMaking Chemotherapy Administration Safer: Implementation of SmartPump Technologyen_GB
dc.contributor.authorLivingston, Mylyndaen_US
dc.author.detailsMylynda Livingston, RN, MS, CNP, Children's Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota, St Paul, Minnesota, USA, email: mylynda.livingston@childrensmn.orgen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182531-
dc.description.abstractPoster Presentation: Medication safety has become a target of national attention. The Institute of Medicine revealed that medication errors occur most frequently during the prescribing and administering of medications (2006). Chemotherapeutic agents have a high toxicity and narrow therapeutic index. The administration of these agents can be very labor intensive and complex for the healthcare provider. Any step missed or overlooked in the process can lead to an error and have serious repercussions for the patient. The innovative Alaris SmartPump(«) system has been implemented in our institution; it is designed to allow programming of medication upper and lower dose, concentration, and infusion rate limits, or Guardrails. The authors used the SmartPump technology and current Children's Oncology Group (COG) guidelines to develop Guardrails(«) for chemotherapy medications delivered on the SmartPump. The Guardrails («) developed give upper and lower limits of dosing and administration times for chemotherapeutic agents based on the patient's weight or body surface area. Any attempt to program the pump outside of the Guardrails(«) generates an alert for the person administering the medication. Between 7/1/06 and 5/31/07, there were a total of 4400 doses of chemotherapy dispensed to run on the SmartPump using Guardrails(«). Of these doses, 12.4% (544) alarmed with an override error indicating the pump was not programmed correctly: 1) 65% (354) involved the nurse choosing the incorrect dose range for the medication. For example, a nurse chose high dose cytarabine instead of medium dose, 2) 29% (159) of the error alarms were due to doses of medications being rounded incorrectly. We used no rounding rules when developing our Guardrails(«) which is different than the 10% rounding rule we use for our computerized order sets. 3) 6% (31) of error alarms were true medication errors that required review by the nurses before the pump would deliver the medication. In response to the Guard...[Please contact the primary investigator for more information about this poster presentation.]REFERENCES: Institute of Medicine Committee on Identifying and Preventing Medication Errors Board On Health Care Services. (2006). Preventing Medication Errors. The National Academies Press: Washington, D.C.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:28:25Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:28:25Z-
dc.conference.date2008en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationSalt Lake City, Utah, USAen_US
dc.descriptionThe 12th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 15-17 October, 2008 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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