2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182532
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Using Music Therapy to Decrease Post-Operative Pain
Author(s):
Macksam, Karen
Author Details:
Karen Macksam, BS, RN, West Allis Memorial Hospital, West Allis, Wisconsin, USA, email: karen.macksam@aurora.org
Abstract:
Poster Presentation: Background and Significance: Patients who had outpatient gynecologic surgery have indicated they experienced poorly managed pain in the immediate post-operative period at the time of follow-up phone call. Research has shown that soothing music decreases post-operative pain. No research was found that systematically evaluated patient-provided music use during and following outpatient gynecologic procedures. Purpose: This preliminary project monitored the patterns of patient-provided music use. Target population included al outpatient gynecologic surgery patients. Patients were given the option to listen to music at any point in the perioperative period. Sample Description: Six patients undergoing outpatient gynecologic surgery ages 18-to-49 years from two facilities were included in this pilot. Approach: For one week, patients at two facilities were invited to bring a working music-playing device, including headphones, and their favorite music to play during the operative, post-anesthesia care unit (PACU), and day surgery (DSC) phases. Per protocol and with the patient's permission, the music was turned on and headphones were put on before the patient was sedated. When the patient entered PACU and DSC, they were given the option of leaving the music on or removing it. Medications were provided to manage pain as requested by patients. Data related to equipment use, pain level, and medication use at each phase of care, and overall satisfaction with music use to manage pain were collected. Outcomes: Two preliminary outcomes were identified: (a) Patients had three patterns of music use; PACU and DSC use (N=1), PACU or DSC use (N-2), and no PACU or DSC use (N-3); and (b) Patients who used music post-operatively seemed to have less pain and medication use than those who did not. Conclusions: The findings were shared with staff in all three areas at the two sites where the data were collected. A formal study, using a larger sample size, a...[Please contact the primary investigator for more information about this poster presentation.] REFERENCES: Joshi, G. P. (1999). Pain management after ambulatory surgery. Ambulatory Surgery, 7(1), 3-12. Laurion, S. and Fetzer, S. J. (2003). The effect of two nursing interventions on the postoperative outcomes of gynecologic laparoscopic patients. Journal of Perianesthesia Nursing, 18(4), 254-261.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2008
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Salt Lake City, Utah, USA
Description:
The 12th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 15-17 October, 2008 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleUsing Music Therapy to Decrease Post-Operative Painen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMacksam, Karenen_US
dc.author.detailsKaren Macksam, BS, RN, West Allis Memorial Hospital, West Allis, Wisconsin, USA, email: karen.macksam@aurora.orgen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182532-
dc.description.abstractPoster Presentation: Background and Significance: Patients who had outpatient gynecologic surgery have indicated they experienced poorly managed pain in the immediate post-operative period at the time of follow-up phone call. Research has shown that soothing music decreases post-operative pain. No research was found that systematically evaluated patient-provided music use during and following outpatient gynecologic procedures. Purpose: This preliminary project monitored the patterns of patient-provided music use. Target population included al outpatient gynecologic surgery patients. Patients were given the option to listen to music at any point in the perioperative period. Sample Description: Six patients undergoing outpatient gynecologic surgery ages 18-to-49 years from two facilities were included in this pilot. Approach: For one week, patients at two facilities were invited to bring a working music-playing device, including headphones, and their favorite music to play during the operative, post-anesthesia care unit (PACU), and day surgery (DSC) phases. Per protocol and with the patient's permission, the music was turned on and headphones were put on before the patient was sedated. When the patient entered PACU and DSC, they were given the option of leaving the music on or removing it. Medications were provided to manage pain as requested by patients. Data related to equipment use, pain level, and medication use at each phase of care, and overall satisfaction with music use to manage pain were collected. Outcomes: Two preliminary outcomes were identified: (a) Patients had three patterns of music use; PACU and DSC use (N=1), PACU or DSC use (N-2), and no PACU or DSC use (N-3); and (b) Patients who used music post-operatively seemed to have less pain and medication use than those who did not. Conclusions: The findings were shared with staff in all three areas at the two sites where the data were collected. A formal study, using a larger sample size, a...[Please contact the primary investigator for more information about this poster presentation.] REFERENCES: Joshi, G. P. (1999). Pain management after ambulatory surgery. Ambulatory Surgery, 7(1), 3-12. Laurion, S. and Fetzer, S. J. (2003). The effect of two nursing interventions on the postoperative outcomes of gynecologic laparoscopic patients. Journal of Perianesthesia Nursing, 18(4), 254-261.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:28:28Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:28:28Z-
dc.conference.date2008en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationSalt Lake City, Utah, USAen_US
dc.descriptionThe 12th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 15-17 October, 2008 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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